Program of Study

High School Programme of Studies

Table of Contents

Course Catalogue


Revised Version 2019-02-20

Original Version 2018-03-14


Welcome

Dear Parents and Students of St. Mary’s International School:

The High School Program of Studies outlines the courses offered and credit requirements for graduation from St. Mary’s International School. In addition to earning a high school diploma, students also have the opportunity to earn the International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma.

The Program of Studies provides course descriptions, and other information (course length, credit value and prerequisites) to help students make informed and appropriate selections during the March course registration process. 

Required course selections are automatically made for students. In some courses placement recommendations are provided by faculty. Grade 10 students begin the process of IB course selection at the beginning of second quarter with meetings for students and parents to explain the IB Diploma program. Final course selections for all students are made prior to course registration in March.

Please be aware that courses at SMIS are offered subject to demand and availability within the scheduling and staffing process. Academic requirements for graduation and IB program configurations are given priority in all scheduling decisions.

Simon Faulkner

High School Principal

Graduation Requirements

A minimum of number of credits are required for the St. Mary’s High School diploma.  Each year long (2 semesters) has a credit value of 1.0.  Semester long courses have a 0.5 credit value.  Credit requirements for graduation were changed beginning for class of 2021.

 

Requirements - Class of 2021 and future classes

Subject Strand

Required Credits

Recommended Credits

English

4.0

4.0

Mathematics

3.0

4.0

Science

3.0

4.0

Social Studies

3.0

3.0

World Languages

3.0

4.0

Physical Education

1.0

1.0

The Arts

0.5

1.0

Religion/Ethics

1.0

1.0

Additional Courses

8.5

8.5

TOTAL

27.0

30.5

 

Requirements - Class of 2019 and 2020

Subject Strand

Required Credits

Recommended Credits

English

4.0

4.0

Mathematics

3.0

4.0

Science

3.0

4.0

Social Studies

3.0

3.0

World Languages

3.0

4.0

Physical Education

1.0

1.0

The Arts

0.5

1.0

Religion/Ethics

1.0

1.0

Additional Courses

4.5

4.5

TOTAL

23.0

26.5

The International Baccalaureate Programme

In addition to earning the SMIS High School Diploma, students have the opportunity to prepare for the externally awarded International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma. The IB Diploma is recognized worldwide and may earn students advanced university standing in many universities. However, it is important to recognize that university requirements and credits are different at each institution, so it is advisable for students and parents to consult universities in their home countries and/or where they intend to study for further details.

 

IB Diploma courses are divided into six groups:

  • Group 1: Studies in Language and Literature
  • Group 2: Language Acquisition
  • Group 3: Individuals and Societies
  • Group 4: Sciences
  • Group 5: Mathematics
  • Group 6: The Arts

 

IB Diploma candidates are required to take one subject from each group.  A student can replace a Group 6 subject with a second subject from Groups 1 - 4.  Group 2 subjects can be replaced with a second subject from Group 1. 

Most IB subjects are offered at the Standard (SL) Level and the Higher (HL) Level.  Students take 3 (and sometimes 4) subjects at the Higher Level (HL) with the remainder taken at the Standard Level (SL).

Each examined subject is graded on a scale of 1 (minimum) to 7 (maximum). The award of the Diploma requires a minimum total of 24 points and the satisfactory completion of three additional requirements:

  • the Extended Essay of some 4000 words, which provides the experience of an independent research paper;
  • the Theory of Knowledge (TOK) course, that explores the relationships among the various disciplines and ensures that students engage in critical reflection and analysis of the knowledge acquired within and beyond the classroom;
  • the compulsory participation in CAS (Creativity, Action, Service) extracurricular and community service activities.

The maximum score attainable in the Diploma is 45 points, including the three possible bonus points for the Extended Essay and TOK.

 

IB (Full) Diploma vs Non-Diploma (IB Course Program)

All SMIS students are IB students in the sense that they are enrolled in at least one IB course in grades 11/12.  Non-Diploma students at SMIS complete the requirements of the IB course program they have selected but have more flexibility and fewer requirements than a Diploma candidate.

 

See the SMIS IB Programme pages for more details.

 

 

Planning Your Path to Graduation

Choosing Courses

It is important that students take graduation planning seriously and make informed decisions when choosing courses. Often the best choices are the courses students feel they will enjoy the most and where they are most likely to be successful. However, in addition to graduation requirements, there are specific courses that are essential for application to some college and university programs. If a student has plans to follow a particular path after graduation, it is extremely important to find out what courses will be required and to do so as early as possible.

 

When choosing courses, students should consider

 

  1. Required or recommended courses leading toward IB Diploma Programme (grades 11 & 12) and future College/University admission requirements.

 

Even though Grade 11 or graduation may seem far away, decisions early in high school  may affect your options later.  Grade 10 students especially need to think about college/university programs and required courses when they choose their IB subjects. Since most IB courses run through Grade 11 and Grade 12,it is important you don’t wait till Grade 12 college application time to realize you needed a different course back in Grade 11.

 

  1. Level of interest in the subject studied 

 

Why does a particular course interest you? You will certainly enjoy a course more if you are both interested in the subject matter and the skills required to study it. For example, does the course involve extended writing and do you like or want to get better at writing?  Does the subject require you to take initiative and be proactive? In some classes students have to learn more independently.  Are you ready for that responsibility?

 

 

Do choose a course because

  • You will enjoy it
  • You have a strong interest in it
  • You are good at it
  • It will help you in your future plans
  • You believe you will succeed in it

 

Do not choose a course because

  • Your friends have chosen it
  • You think it will be easy
  • You have been told it involves less work
  • Relatives or friends tell you to do it without good reason
  • You just like the teacher

 

Sample program - 4 years at a glance - IB Diploma Candidate

STRAND

9

10

11 (IB1)

12(IB2)

English

English 9

English 10

English Literature

OR

 English Language and Literature

English Literature

OR

 English Language and Literature

Mathematics

Mathematics 9

OR

Mathematics 9 Extended

Mathematics 10

OR

Mathematics 10 Extended

 Mathematics:

Analysis and Approaches 

OR

Applications and Interpretations

 Mathematics:

Analysis and Approaches 

OR

Applications and Interpretations

Science

Science 9

Chemistry 10

AND ONE OF

Physics 10

Biology 10

Biology

Physics

Chemistry

Environmental S.S.

Design Technology

Biology

Physics

Chemistry

Environmental S.S.

 Design Technology

Social Studies

Western World History 9

Eastern Civilizations

AND

Economics, Finance and Business Studies

History

Economics

I.T.G.S.

Psychology

History

Economics

I.T.G.S.

Psychology

World Languages

Japanese

OR

French

Japanese

OR

French

Japanese

OR

French

Japanese

OR

French

Physical Education

Physical Education

Physical Education

Any credits required for graduation

Any credits required for graduation

Ethics & Religion

Ethics or Religion

Ethics or Religion

The Arts

Minimum 1 semester - any Arts course

Other

Personal Life Management

PLUS

additional courses to make total 8.0 credits

Additional courses to make total 8.0 credits

6th IB1 course

+

TOK

+

1.0 credits

6th IB2 course

+

TOK

+

1.0 credits

OR

Study hall

 

 

 

Sample program - 4 years at a glance - IB Course Program

STRAND

9

10

11 (IB1)

12(IB2)

English

 

English 9

 

English 10

Non-IB courses in BLUE font

Minimum two additional credits from

 

English Studies 11 + English Studies 12

IB English Literature

 IB English Language and Literature

Mathematics

Mathematics 9

OR

Mathematics 9 Extended

Mathematics 10

OR

Mathematics 10 Extended

Minimum one additional credit from

 

Math Studies 11 / Math Studies 12

IB Mathematics (2 options)

 

Science

Science 9

Chemistry 10

AND ONE OF

Physics 10

Biology 10

Minimum one additional credit from

IB Biology

IB Physics

IB Chemistry

IB Environmental S.S.

 IB Design Technology

Social Studies

Western World History 9

Eastern Civilizations

AND

Economics, Finance and Business Studies

Minimum one additional credit from

IB History

IB Economics

IB I.T.G.S.

IB Psychology

World Languages

Japanese

OR

French

Japanese

OR

French

Minimum one additional credit

IB or non-IB

Physical Education

Physical Education

Physical Education

Any credits required for graduation

Ethics & Religion

Ethics or Religion

Ethics or Religion

The Arts

Minimum 1 semester - any Arts course

Other

Personal Life Management

PLUS

additional courses to make total 8.0 credits

Additional courses to make total 8.0 credits

Students may take Study Hall in Senior Year

 

 

 

 

 

Subject Strands

Course offerings and progressions are outlined for each of the subject strands listed.  Suggested progressions from grade 9 to grade 12 are shown for each subject strand.  These progressions are recommendations and students are encouraged to make appropriate choices based on discussions with counsellors, teachers, and the IB coordinator.  

 

English

Mathematics

Science

Social Studies

World Languages

Physical Education

Ethics, Religion and Personal Growth

The Arts

Technology and Design

 

 

For detailed information on individual courses, please consult the Course Catalogue.

 

Although listed in the course catalogue but a given course may not run in a given academic year or semester dependent on student interest, staffing, and scheduling constraints.

 

English

The SMIS English program aims to promote the acquisition, use, and appreciation of the English language.  We seek to guide students toward a clear understanding and fluent expression of ideas through critical thinking, speaking, listening, reading, viewing, researching, and writing skills. 

 

English Credit Courses (4.0 credits required)

 

9

 

10

 

11

 

12

 

 

English 9

?

English 10

?

English Literature

IB HL1

?

English Literature

IB HL2

 

 

?

English Literature

IB SL1

?

English Literature

IB SL2

 

 

?

English Language and Literature

IB HL1

?

English Language and Literature

IB HL2

 

 

?

English Language and Literature

IB SL1

?

English Language and Literature

IB SL2

 

 

?

English Studies 11

?

English Studies 12

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other Courses (note: these classes do not count towards English credit graduation requirements)

 

 

Journalism

 

Literature as Film

 

The Novel

 

 

 

 

Detailed information about English courses can be found in the course catalogue.

 

Mathematics

The St. Mary’s International School Mathematics department aims to ensure our students are numerate and embody mathematical habits of mind to spark curiosity and enjoyment in mathematics. The curriculum will develop fundamentals, skills and processes they can use to critically analyze information encountered in their daily and future lives.

 

Mathematics Credit Courses (3.0 credits required)

The mathematics curriculum is evolving in stages for students graduating in 2021 and 2022.  The IB Diploma math courses are changing significantly beginning in the 2019-2020 school year (first examinations in 2021).  There are other changes happening to vertically align the Grade 9/10 program with the new IB offerings and ensure a smooth transition from Grade 8.  Please refer to the appropriate course sequence based on your year of graduation.

 

Class of 2020

Class of 2020 will select grade 11/12 math classes to best match IB Diploma requirements and planned pathways to graduation.

 

Class of 2021

 

9

 

10

 

11

 

12

 

 

Integrated Mathematics 9 (Hons)

?

Algebra II (Hons)

 

?

 

Mathematics: Applications and Interpretations

IB HL1

?

Mathematics: Applications and Interpretations

IB HL2

 

 

Mathematics: Analysis and Approaches 

IB HL1

?

Mathematics: Analysis and Approaches

IB HL2

 

 

Integrated Mathematics 9

 

?

Integrated Mathematics 10

?

Mathematics: Applications and Interpretations

IB SL1

?

Mathematics: Applications and Interpretations

IB SL2

 

 

Mathematics: Analysis and Approaches 

IB SL1

?

Mathematics: Analysis and Approaches

IB SL2

 

 

 

?

Math Studies 11

?

Math Studies 12

 

 

 

 

 

 

Class of 2022

 

9

 

10

 

11

 

12

 

 

Mathematics 9

(Extended)

?

Mathematics 10

(Extended)

 

?

 

Mathematics: Applications and Interpretations

IB HL1

?

Mathematics: Applications and Interpretations

IB HL2

 

 

Mathematics: Analysis and Approaches 

IB HL1

?

Mathematics: Analysis and Approaches

IB HL2

 

 

Mathematics 9

?

Mathematics 10

?

Mathematics: Applications and Interpretations

IB SL1

?

Mathematics: Applications and Interpretations

IB SL2

 

 

Mathematics: Analysis and Approaches 

IB SL1

?

Mathematics: Analysis and Approaches

IB SL2

 

 

 

?

Math Studies 11

?

Math Studies 12

 

 

Detailed information about Mathematics courses can be found in the course catalogue.

 

 

Science

The SMIS science program aims to explain, model, and predict various aspects of the Universe in which we live. The science program provides opportunities for scientific study and creativity that will stimulate and challenge students. The knowledge, understandings and scientific skills gained by students will enable them to analyze, communicate, evaluate, and interpret scientific information. The program will develop student awareness of the moral, ethical, social, economic, and environmental implications of integrating science and technology in the 21st century.

 

Science Credit Courses (3.0 credits required)

 

9

 

10

 

11

 

12

 

 

Science 9

?

Chemistry 10

?

Chemistry IB HL1

?

Chemistry IB HL2

 

 

Chemistry IB SL1

?

Chemistry IB HL2

 

 

?

Physics 10

?

Physics IB HL1

?

Physics IB HL2

 

 

Physics IB SL1

?

Physics IB SL2

 

 

?

Biology 10

?

Biology IB HL1

?

Biology IB HL2

 

 

Biology IB SL1

?

Biology IB SL2

 

 

 

 

 

 

Environmental Systems & Societies IB SL1

?

Environmental Systems & Societies IB SL2

 

 

 

 

 

 

Design and Technology IB SL1

?

Design and Technology IB SL2

 

 

Detailed information about Science courses can be found in the course catalogue.

 

Social Studies

The SMIS Social Studies program encourages and promotes acquisition of knowledge, skills, and dispositions that enable students to become informed, responsible, and contributing members of the local and global society.

 

 

Social Studies Credit Courses (3.0 credits required)

 

 

9

 

10

 

11

 

12

 

 

Western World History 9

?

Eastern Civilizations 10

?

History of Asia and Oceania  IB HL1

?

History of Asia and Oceania IB HL2

 

 

?

History IB SL

 

 

 

 

 

Economics,

Finance and Business Studies 10

?

Economics IB HL1

?

Economics IB HL2

 

 

?

Economics IB SL1

 

?

Economics IB SL2

 

 

 

 

 

 

Psychology IB SL1

?

Psychology IB SL2

 

 

 

 

Information Technology in a Global Society IB SL1

?

Information Technology in a Global Society IB SL2

 

 

 

Information Technology in a Global Society IB HL1

?

Information Technology in a Global Society IB HL2

 

 

Detailed information about Social Studies courses can be found in the course catalogue.

 

 

World Languages

The SMIS World Languages program philosophy is currently under development.  All academic programs at SMIS are designed to prepare students for higher education through rigorous and challenging curriculum.  Through well crafted learning activities, students develop critical thinking skills, express creativity and learn to communicate effectively.

 

 

World Languages Credit Courses (3.0 credits required)

 

 

9

 

10

 

11

 

12

 

 

French 3

?

French 4

?

French B IB HL1

?

French B IB HL2

 

 

French B IB SL1

?

French B IB SL2

 

 

9

 

10

 

11

 

12

 

 

Japanese A

Level II 1

?

Japanese A

Level II 2

?

Japanese A Language and Literature IB HL1

?

Japanese A Language and Literature IB HL2

 

 

Japanese A

Level I 1

?

Japanese A

Level I 2

?

Japanese A Language and Literature IB SL1

?

Japanese A Language and Literature IB SL2

 

 

Japanese B

Level II

?

Japanese B

Level III

?

Japanese B IB HL1

?

Japanese B IB HL2

 

 

Japanese B

Level III

?

Japanese B

Level IV

?

 

 

Japanese B

Level I

?

Japanese B

Level II

?

Japanese B IB SL1

?

Japanese B IB SL2

 

 

Japanese AI

Level 1

 

Japanese AI

Level 1

 

Japanese ab initio

 IB SL1

?

Japanese ab initio IB SL2

 

 

 

Other Courses (note: these classes do not count towards World Language credit graduation requirements)

 

 

Introduction to Japanese Culture

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Detailed information about World Languages courses can be found in the course catalogue.

 

 

Physical Education

The SMIS Physical Education program philosophy is currently under development. 

 

 

Physical Education Credit Courses (1.0 credits required)

 

 

9-10

 

9-12

 

 

 

 

 

 

Physical Education

 

Strength and Movement

 

 

 

 

 

 

Detailed information about Physical Education courses can be found in the course catalogue.

Ethics, Religion and Personal Growth

The SMIS Ethics, Religion, and Personal Growth program philosophy is currently under development.

 

Ethics and Religion Credit Courses (1.0 credits required).

 

9-12

 

9-12

 

9-12

 

9-12

 

 

Ethics and Virtues in Social Sciences

 

Ethics and Virtues in Natural Sciences

 

Business Ethics

 

Catholic I: Introduction to Catholicism

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Catholic II: Scripture and Pop Culture

 

Other Courses

Grade 9 students must enrol in Personal Life Management.  All IB Diploma candidates take Theory of Knowledge.

 

9

 

9-12

 

10-12

 

11-12

 

 

Personal Life Management

 

Guided Learning

 

Futures Academy

 

IB Theory of Knowledge

 

 

Detailed information about the above courses can be found in the course catalogue.

 

 

The Arts

The SMIS Arts program philosophy is currently under development. 

 

The Arts Credit Courses (0.5 credits required)

 

 

9-12

 

9-12

 

11

 

12

 

 

Ceramics I

?

Ceramics II

 

Visual Arts IB HL1

?

Visual Arts IB HL2

 

 

Introduction to Art

 

 

 

Visual Arts IB SL1

?

Visual Arts IB SL2

 

 

Pencil Portfolio and other 2D Mediums

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9-12

 

9-12

 

11

 

12

 

 

Music Explorations

 

Varsity Ensemble

 

Music IB HL1

?

Music IB HL2

 

 

Bell Choir

 

Jazz Band

 

Music IB SL1

?

Music IB SL2

 

 

Men’s Choir

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Acting

 

 

 

 

 

 

Concert Band

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Detailed information about Arts courses can be found in the course catalogue.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Technology and Design

The philosophy that underlies broad-based technological education at SMIS is that students learn best by doing. Technology and Design curriculum therefore adopts an activity-based, project-driven approach that involves students in problem solving as they gain knowledge, skills and experience in the subject area of their choice.The SMIS curricular program explores the world of technology and design, providing opportunities for students to research, plan, create, experiment, collaborate, and think critically about the applications of technology, design, related issues.

Technology and Design Credit Courses

 

9-12

 

9-12

 

11

 

12

 

 

Communications Technology: Digital Photography I

?

Communications Technology: Digital Photography II

 

Design and Technology IB SL1

?

Design and Technology IB SL2

 

 

Design Technology I

?

Design Technology II

 

 

 

 

 

 

Communications Technology: Film, Audio, and VFX

?

Communications Technology: Advanced Projects

 

IB Design and Technology courses count towards the Science credit graduation requirement

 

 

Communications Technology:

Graphics and Animation

?

 

 

 

 

 

 

Computer Science I

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Engineering and Entrepreneurship

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Embedded Systems I

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yearbook

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Detailed information about the above courses can be found in the course catalogue.

Course Catalogue

  • Language Arts
  • Mathematics
  • Science
  • Social Studies
  • World Languages
  • Fine Arts
  • Technology Courses
  • Religion and Ethics
  • Physical Education
  • Student Resource
  • IB Courses
  • Other
  • Science

    Science 9
    Credit Type: SCI
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): none
    Science 9 develops core inquiry skills including investigation design, data logging, data management and processing, and communication. These foundations are emphasized through topics in chemistry, physics, and biology that prepare the students for subject specific science courses in Grade 10. Beginning with the big ideas introduced in Middle School science, the goal of Science 9 is for the student to master these concepts and then extend them through both broader and deeper understandings. The chemistry units of study focus on structure and properties of matter. Students develop understandings of physical and chemical properties, atomic structure, chemical bonding, and reactions. The physics portion of the course introduces students to concepts and understandings related to motion, forces, and thermal physics. These units have a strong emphasis on graphing skills and using sensors to collect data. In biology, students will develop knowledge and conceptual understanding of the cell as the basic structure of life. Using a microscope to examine and diagram cell structure is a large component of the practical program. Study of membranes and cellular transport concludes the biology content.
    Biology 10
    Credit Type: SCI
    Credit Value: 0.5
    Prerequisite(s): Science 9
    Biology 10 is a 0.5 year (1 semester) course taken by grade 10 students. The course focuses on bridging the gap between Grade 9 Science and IB Biology. Although some challenging concepts are introduced, the intention of Biology 10 is not to teach the IB syllabus in advance, but rather to adequately prepare the students for what is to come by providing them exposure and experiences. The expectation of all Grade 10 courses is that students will progress towards becoming competent scientists with a solid set of laboratory and inquiry skills. Lab activities are more rigorous and encourage a professional approach to scientific investigation through the development of more technical lab skills such as colorimetric analysis, titration and the use of data-loggers. A similar philosophy applies to documentation of methodology, data collection and analysis and the evaluation of the investigation. Students are challenged to communicate concisely using appropriate scientific conventions and terminology. Biology 10 has a strong emphasis on understanding the components of a healthy diet. Topics include The Molecules of Life, Proteins, and Human Nutrition.
    Chemistry 10
    Credit Type: SCI
    Credit Value: 0.5
    Prerequisite(s): Science 9
    Chemistry 10 is a 0.5 year (1 semester) course taken by grade 10 students. The course focuses on bridging the gap between Grade 9 Science and IB Chemistry. Although some challenging concepts are introduced, the intention of Chemistry 10 is not to teach the IB syllabus in advance, but rather to adequately prepare the students for what is to come by providing them exposure and experiences. The expectation of all Grade 10 courses is that students will progress towards becoming competent scientists with a solid set of laboratory and inquiry skills. Lab activities are more rigorous and encourage a professional approach to scientific investigation through the development of more technical lab skills such as colorimetric analysis, titration and the use of data-loggers. A similar philosophy applies to documentation of methodology, data collection and analysis and the evaluation of the investigation. Students are challenged to communicate concisely using appropriate scientific conventions and terminology. The topics studied in Chemistry 10 include Measurement and Numeracy, Quantitative Chemistry, Acids & Bases, and Organic Chemistry.
    Physics 10
    Credit Type: SCI
    Credit Value: 0.5
    Prerequisite(s): Science 9
    Physics 10 is a 0.5 year (1 semester) course taken by grade 10 students. The course focuses on bridging the gap between Grade 9 Science and IB Physics. Although some challenging concepts are introduced, the intention of Physics 10 is not to teach the IB syllabus in advance, but rather to adequately prepare the students for what is to come by providing them exposure and experiences. The expectation of all Grade 10 courses is that students will progress towards becoming competent scientists with a solid set of laboratory and inquiry skills. Lab activities are more rigorous and encourage a professional approach to scientific investigation through the development of more technical lab skills such as colorimetric analysis, titration and the use of data-loggers. A similar philosophy applies to documentation of methodology, data collection and analysis and the evaluation of the investigation. Students are challenged to communicate concisely using appropriate scientific conventions and terminology. The topics studied in Physics 10 include Data Analysis, Energy Work and Power, Electric Circuits, and The Nature of Waves.
    Environmental Sys. and Soc. IB SL 1
    Credit Type: SCI
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Department approval
    ESS is firmly grounded in both a scientific exploration of environmental systems in their structure and function, and in the exploration of cultural, economic, ethical, political and social interactions of societies with the environment. As a result of studying this course, students will become equipped with the ability to recognize and evaluate the impact of our complex system of societies on the natural world.In addition, students are required to participate in a cross-discipline (Group IV) project that requires them to collaborate with all other science students in the IB program that is specifically assessed for personal skills and the ability to work within a team framework. The IB Environmental Systems and Societies SL subject brief provides more detail on the course description, aims, curricular topics and assessment.
    Biology IB SL 1
    Credit Type: SCI
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Chemistry 10 + Biology 10 + Department approval
    In IB Biology there are four basic biological concepts that run throughout the course: Structure and Function, Universality Versus Diversity, Equilibrium within Systems, and Evolution. A variety of topics covered in this course are Cells, the Chemistry of Life, Genetics, Ecology and Evolution, and Human Health and Physiology. It is hoped that students will not only acquire a body of facts, but also develop a broad, general understanding of the principles of biology at the same time. The required Individual Investigation gives the students an opportunity to design controlled experiments, properly analyze and present data, and communicate their observations through evaluation and conclusion. In addition, students are required to participate in a cross-discipline (Group IV) project that requires them to collaborate with all other science students in the IB program that is specifically assessed for personal skills and the ability to work within a team framework. The IB Biology SL/HL subject briefs provide more detail on the course description, aims, curricular topics and assessment. More information can be found following these Biology SL/HL links.
    Design Technology I
    Credit Type: ELEC
    Credit Value: 0.5
    Prerequisite(s): none
    Preliminary course focuses on a series of small design projects undertaken bi-monthly. Students aim to demonstrate learnt skills and knowledge through the practical application of these design projects. Strengthening and building their confidence and encouraging independent design thinking and can select project from approximately forty thematic study units which include, although not limited to; Automata, Ornithoptors, Desktop Publishing, Animation, video, Computer Aided Design, Propulsion Systems, Mechanics, Computer Programming, Website Creation etc..
    Biology IB SL 2
    Credit Type: SCI
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Chemistry 10 + Biology 10 + Department approval
    In IB Biology there are four basic biological concepts that run throughout the course: Structure and Function, Universality Versus Diversity, Equilibrium within Systems, and Evolution. A variety of topics covered in this course are Cells, the Chemistry of Life, Genetics, Ecology and Evolution, and Human Health and Physiology. It is hoped that students will not only acquire a body of facts, but also develop a broad, general understanding of the principles of biology at the same time. The required Individual Investigation gives the students an opportunity to design controlled experiments, properly analyze and present data, and communicate their observations through evaluation and conclusion. In addition, students are required to participate in a cross-discipline (Group IV) project that requires them to collaborate with all other science students in the IB program that is specifically assessed for personal skills and the ability to work within a team framework. The IB Biology SL/HL subject briefs provide more detail on the course description, aims, curricular topics and assessment. More information can be found following these Biology SL/HL links.
    Design Technology II
    Credit Type: ELEC
    Credit Value: 0.5
    Prerequisite(s): Design Technology I
    This course provides students who have successfully completed the Design Technology I, preliminary course in Design and Technology with an opportunity to extend their knowledge and understanding of design through the development of a Major Design Project and through an investigation of innovation and emerging technologies. Studying this course will allow students to investigate and the hands-on experience involved in designing and producing. Students work independently on a major design project involving the identification of a need or opportunity then follow a design process to realize a solution.
    Biology IB HL 1
    Credit Type: SCI
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Chemistry 10 + Biology 10 + Department approval
    In IB Biology there are four basic biological concepts that run throughout the course: Structure and Function, Universality Versus Diversity, Equilibrium within Systems, and Evolution. A variety of topics covered in this course are Cells, the Chemistry of Life, Genetics, Ecology and Evolution, and Human Health and Physiology. It is hoped that students will not only acquire a body of facts, but also develop a broad, general understanding of the principles of biology at the same time. The required Individual Investigation gives the students an opportunity to design controlled experiments, properly analyze and present data, and communicate their observations through evaluation and conclusion. In addition, students are required to participate in a cross-discipline (Group IV) project that requires them to collaborate with all other science students in the IB program that is specifically assessed for personal skills and the ability to work within a team framework. The IB Biology SL/HL subject briefs provide more detail on the course description, aims, curricular topics and assessment. More information can be found following these Biology SL/HL links.
    Biology IB HL 2
    Credit Type: SCI
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Chemistry 10 + Biology 10 + Department approval
    In IB Biology there are four basic biological concepts that run throughout the course: Structure and Function, Universality Versus Diversity, Equilibrium within Systems, and Evolution. A variety of topics covered in this course are Cells, the Chemistry of Life, Genetics, Ecology and Evolution, and Human Health and Physiology. It is hoped that students will not only acquire a body of facts, but also develop a broad, general understanding of the principles of biology at the same time. The required Individual Investigation gives the students an opportunity to design controlled experiments, properly analyze and present data, and communicate their observations through evaluation and conclusion. In addition, students are required to participate in a cross-discipline (Group IV) project that requires them to collaborate with all other science students in the IB program that is specifically assessed for personal skills and the ability to work within a team framework. The IB Biology SL/HL subject briefs provide more detail on the course description, aims, curricular topics and assessment. More information can be found following these Biology SL/HL links.
    Chemistry IB SL 1
    Credit Type: SCI
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Chemistry 10 + Department approval
    IB Chemistry covers 11 core topics (and 1 option) that are central to the foundations of physical, inorganic and organic chemistry, including concepts such as stoichiometry, atomic structure, chemical bonding, chemical kinetics, thermal chemistry, acids and bases, and equilibrium. The additional higher level materials are an extension to the core topics in terms of depth and breadth of the core content. The purpose of the curriculum is to expose students to major scientific themes and demonstrate the connections and interactions that exist between the concepts. The required Individual Investigation gives the students an opportunity to design controlled experiments, properly analyze and present data, and communicate their observations through evaluation and conclusion. In addition, students are required to participate in a cross-discipline (Group IV) project that requires them to collaborate with all other science students in the IB program that is specifically assessed for personal skills and the ability to work within a team framework. The IB Chemistry SL/HL subject briefs provide more detail on the course description, aims, curricular topics and assessment. More information can be found by following these Chemistry SL/HL links.
    Chemistry IB SL 2
    Credit Type: SCI
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Chemistry 10 + Department approval
    IB Chemistry covers 11 core topics (and 1 option) that are central to the foundations of physical, inorganic and organic chemistry, including concepts such as stoichiometry, atomic structure, chemical bonding, chemical kinetics, thermal chemistry, acids and bases, and equilibrium. The additional higher level materials are an extension to the core topics in terms of depth and breadth of the core content. The purpose of the curriculum is to expose students to major scientific themes and demonstrate the connections and interactions that exist between the concepts. The required Individual Investigation gives the students an opportunity to design controlled experiments, properly analyze and present data, and communicate their observations through evaluation and conclusion. In addition, students are required to participate in a cross-discipline (Group IV) project that requires them to collaborate with all other science students in the IB program that is specifically assessed for personal skills and the ability to work within a team framework. The IB Chemistry SL/HL subject briefs provide more detail on the course description, aims, curricular topics and assessment. More information can be found by following these Chemistry SL/HL links.
    Chemistry IB HL 1
    Credit Type: SCI
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Chemistry 10 + Department approval
    IB Chemistry covers 11 core topics (and 1 option) that are central to the foundations of physical, inorganic and organic chemistry, including concepts such as stoichiometry, atomic structure, chemical bonding, chemical kinetics, thermal chemistry, acids and bases, and equilibrium. The additional higher level materials are an extension to the core topics in terms of depth and breadth of the core content. The purpose of the curriculum is to expose students to major scientific themes and demonstrate the connections and interactions that exist between the concepts. The required Individual Investigation gives the students an opportunity to design controlled experiments, properly analyze and present data, and communicate their observations through evaluation and conclusion. In addition, students are required to participate in a cross-discipline (Group IV) project that requires them to collaborate with all other science students in the IB program that is specifically assessed for personal skills and the ability to work within a team framework. The IB Chemistry SL/HL subject briefs provide more detail on the course description, aims, curricular topics and assessment. More information can be found by following these Chemistry SL/HL links.
    Chemistry IB HL 2
    Credit Type: SCI
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Chemistry 10 + Department approval
    IB Chemistry covers 11 core topics (and 1 option) that are central to the foundations of physical, inorganic and organic chemistry, including concepts such as stoichiometry, atomic structure, chemical bonding, chemical kinetics, thermal chemistry, acids and bases, and equilibrium. The additional higher level materials are an extension to the core topics in terms of depth and breadth of the core content. The purpose of the curriculum is to expose students to major scientific themes and demonstrate the connections and interactions that exist between the concepts. The required Individual Investigation gives the students an opportunity to design controlled experiments, properly analyze and present data, and communicate their observations through evaluation and conclusion. In addition, students are required to participate in a cross-discipline (Group IV) project that requires them to collaborate with all other science students in the IB program that is specifically assessed for personal skills and the ability to work within a team framework. The IB Chemistry SL/HL subject briefs provide more detail on the course description, aims, curricular topics and assessment. More information can be found by following these Chemistry SL/HL links.
    Engineering and Entrepreneurship
    Credit Type: ELEC
    Credit Value: 0.5
    Prerequisite(s): none
    The SMIS Entrepreneurial Engineering course envelops mind-set and practical skills that enable you to create and realize new technical competences with business savvy to generate, and develop ideas to reality - from thought to action. This pioneering, and holistic course addresses the formulation of Entrepreneurship concepts and strategies developed empirically from the experiences of high-tech companies. These are more practical than theoretical and are intended to push engineering entrepreneurship to the incisive insights of leading engineering experts, entrepreneurs, numerous examples, and case studies/interactive discussions simulating the experiences of technical entrepreneurs, this course series systematically covers almost all the issues aspiring technical entrepreneurs should consider in developing their new ventures. These include funding, intellectual property, project management, timing, technological change, globalization, product positioning, and contingency planning, as well as marketing and financial considerations. The course includes the following topics: Customer-Driven Innovation: Creative Product Design: Iterative Prototyping: Engineering Product Development, Negotiation, Mediation, and Conflict Resolution, Public Speaking, Business Law, Principles of Accounting, technical and Managerial Communications, Launching the Venture, Special Engineering Topics, Creativity, Innovation and Entrepreneurship, Creative Design Process of Products, Innovative Social Enterprises, Management of Innovation, Biomedical, Entrepreneurial Leadership, Entrepreneurial Marketing, Entrepreneurial Finance, Entrepreneurship and Business Planning.
    Environmental Sys. and Soc. IB SL 2
    Credit Type: SCI
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Department approval
    ESS is firmly grounded in both a scientific exploration of environmental systems in their structure and function, and in the exploration of cultural, economic, ethical, political and social interactions of societies with the environment. As a result of studying this course, students will become equipped with the ability to recognize and evaluate the impact of our complex system of societies on the natural world.In addition, students are required to participate in a cross-discipline (Group IV) project that requires them to collaborate with all other science students in the IB program that is specifically assessed for personal skills and the ability to work within a team framework. The IB Environmental Systems and Societies SL subject brief provides more detail on the course description, aims, curricular topics and assessment. More information can be found following this Environmental systems and societies SL link.
    Physics IB SL 1
    Credit Type: SCI
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Chemistry 10 + Physics 10 + Department approval
    Physics, the foundation of science, seeks to explain the 'why' of the universe. From the smallest constituents of matter to the vast distances of space, physics describes the fundamental principles that govern our physical world. The IB SL Physics course is a two year program consisting of eight core units of study and one additional option topic, collectively giving the student strong foundations in classical physics. The additional HL syllabus material extends the depth and breadth of concepts introduced in core units. Scientific investigation is a significant part of the course. The required Individual Investigation gives the students an opportunity to design controlled experiments, properly analyze and present data, and communicate their observations through evaluation and conclusion. In addition, students are required to participate in a cross-discipline (Group IV) project that requires them to collaborate with all other science students in the IB program that is specifically assessed for personal skills and the ability to work within a team framework. The IB Physics SL/HL subject briefs provide more detail on the course description, aims, curricular topics and assessment. More information can be found following these Physics SL/HL links.
    Physics IB SL 2
    Credit Type: SCI
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Chemistry 10 + Physics 10 + Department approval
    Physics, the foundation of science, seeks to explain the 'why' of the universe. From the smallest constituents of matter to the vast distances of space, physics describes the fundamental principles that govern our physical world. The IB SL Physics course is a two year program consisting of eight core units of study and one additional option topic, collectively giving the student strong foundations in classical physics. The additional HL syllabus material extends the depth and breadth of concepts introduced in core units. Scientific investigation is a significant part of the course. The required Individual Investigation gives the students an opportunity to design controlled experiments, properly analyze and present data, and communicate their observations through evaluation and conclusion. In addition, students are required to participate in a cross-discipline (Group IV) project that requires them to collaborate with all other science students in the IB program that is specifically assessed for personal skills and the ability to work within a team framework. The IB Physics SL/HL subject briefs provide more detail on the course description, aims, curricular topics and assessment. More information can be found following these Physics SL/HL links.
    Physics IB HL 1
    Credit Type: SCI
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Chemistry 10 + Physics 10 + Department approval
    Physics, the foundation of science, seeks to explain the 'why' of the universe. From the smallest constituents of matter to the vast distances of space, physics describes the fundamental principles that govern our physical world. The IB SL Physics course is a two year program consisting of eight core units of study and one additional option topic, collectively giving the student strong foundations in classical physics. The additional HL syllabus material extends the depth and breadth of concepts introduced in core units. Scientific investigation is a significant part of the course. The required Individual Investigation gives the students an opportunity to design controlled experiments, properly analyze and present data, and communicate their observations through evaluation and conclusion. In addition, students are required to participate in a cross-discipline (Group IV) project that requires them to collaborate with all other science students in the IB program that is specifically assessed for personal skills and the ability to work within a team framework. The IB Physics SL/HL subject briefs provide more detail on the course description, aims, curricular topics and assessment. More information can be found following these Physics SL/HL links.
    Physics IB HL 2
    Credit Type: SCI
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Chemistry 10 + Physics 10 + Department approval
    Physics, the foundation of science, seeks to explain the 'why' of the universe. From the smallest constituents of matter to the vast distances of space, physics describes the fundamental principles that govern our physical world. The IB SL Physics course is a two year program consisting of eight core units of study and one additional option topic, collectively giving the student strong foundations in classical physics. The additional HL syllabus material extends the depth and breadth of concepts introduced in core units. Scientific investigation is a significant part of the course. The required Individual Investigation gives the students an opportunity to design controlled experiments, properly analyze and present data, and communicate their observations through evaluation and conclusion. In addition, students are required to participate in a cross-discipline (Group IV) project that requires them to collaborate with all other science students in the IB program that is specifically assessed for personal skills and the ability to work within a team framework. The IB Physics SL/HL subject briefs provide more detail on the course description, aims, curricular topics and assessment. More information can be found following these Physics SL/HL links.
    Design Technology IB SL 1
    Credit Type: SCI
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Department approval
    Diploma Programme design technology is based on a model of learning that incorporates knowledge, skills and design principles in problem-solving contexts, while at the same time maximizing the use of local and readily available resources. It assumes no previous experience in either technology or design. The intent is not solely the acquisition of knowledge about design and technology, which may change or become outdated, but it is about learning how to adapt to new experiences and to approach problems with the appropriate skills and the relevant techniques to identify the important elements and, crucially, to develop the optimum solutions. The design cycle is at the core of the course, and it is expected that students will use this process in the practical investigative work as well as in the theory. Each element in the design cycle represents an aspect of design technology, which, when viewed together, constitutes a holistic approach. Any given element is therefore only to be seen in the context of the whole process. In addition, students are required to participate in a cross-discipline (Group IV) project that requires them to collaborate with all other science students in the IB program that is specifically assessed for personal skills and the ability to work within a team framework. The IB Design Technology SL/HL subject briefs provide more detail on the course description, aims, curricular topics and assessment.
    Design Technology IB SL 2
    Credit Type: SCI
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Department approval
    Diploma Programme design technology is based on a model of learning that incorporates knowledge, skills and design principles in problem-solving contexts, while at the same time maximizing the use of local and readily available resources. It assumes no previous experience in either technology or design. The intent is not solely the acquisition of knowledge about design and technology, which may change or become outdated, but it is about learning how to adapt to new experiences and to approach problems with the appropriate skills and the relevant techniques to identify the important elements and, crucially, to develop the optimum solutions. The design cycle is at the core of the course, and it is expected that students will use this process in the practical investigative work as well as in the theory. Each element in the design cycle represents an aspect of design technology, which, when viewed together, constitutes a holistic approach. Any given element is therefore only to be seen in the context of the whole process. In addition, students are required to participate in a cross-discipline (Group IV) project that requires them to collaborate with all other science students in the IB program that is specifically assessed for personal skills and the ability to work within a team framework. The IB Design Technology SL/HL subject briefs provide more detail on the course description, aims, curricular topics and assessment.
    Design Technology IB HL 1
    Credit Type: SCI
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Department approval
    Diploma Programme design technology is based on a model of learning that incorporates knowledge, skills and design principles in problem-solving contexts, while at the same time maximizing the use of local and readily available resources. It assumes no previous experience in either technology or design. The intent is not solely the acquisition of knowledge about design and technology, which may change or become outdated, but it is about learning how to adapt to new experiences and to approach problems with the appropriate skills and the relevant techniques to identify the important elements and, crucially, to develop the optimum solutions. The design cycle is at the core of the course, and it is expected that students will use this process in the practical investigative work as well as in the theory. Each element in the design cycle represents an aspect of design technology, which, when viewed together, constitutes a holistic approach. Any given element is therefore only to be seen in the context of the whole process. In addition, students are required to participate in a cross-discipline (Group IV) project that requires them to collaborate with all other science students in the IB program that is specifically assessed for personal skills and the ability to work within a team framework. The IB Design Technology SL/HL subject briefs provide more detail on the course description, aims, curricular topics and assessment.
    Design Technology IB HL 2
    Credit Type: SCI
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Department approval
    Diploma Programme design technology is based on a model of learning that incorporates knowledge, skills and design principles in problem-solving contexts, while at the same time maximizing the use of local and readily available resources. It assumes no previous experience in either technology or design. The intent is not solely the acquisition of knowledge about design and technology, which may change or become outdated, but it is about learning how to adapt to new experiences and to approach problems with the appropriate skills and the relevant techniques to identify the important elements and, crucially, to develop the optimum solutions. The design cycle is at the core of the course, and it is expected that students will use this process in the practical investigative work as well as in the theory. Each element in the design cycle represents an aspect of design technology, which, when viewed together, constitutes a holistic approach. Any given element is therefore only to be seen in the context of the whole process. In addition, students are required to participate in a cross-discipline (Group IV) project that requires them to collaborate with all other science students in the IB program that is specifically assessed for personal skills and the ability to work within a team framework. The IB Design Technology SL/HL subject briefs provide more detail on the course description, aims, curricular topics and assessment.

    Fine Arts

    2D Art I
    Credit Type: ART
    Credit Value: 0.5
    Prerequisite(s): none
    This will be the course for you to develop your 2D art skills. We will explore a variety of 2D mediums such as acrylics, watercolor, and oil pastels. An emphasis on critical analysis of art is also a large part of the course.
    2D Art II
    Credit Type: ART
    Credit Value: 0.5
    Prerequisite(s): 2D Art I
    This will be the course for you to develop your 2D art skills. We will explore a variety of 2D mediums such as acrylics, watercolor, and oil pastels. An emphasis on critical analysis of art is also a large part of the course.
    Music IB SL 1
    Credit Type: ART
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Department approval
    This course is designed for music students with varied backgrounds in music performance or composition. The aim of the IB music program is to give music students the opportunity to explore and enjoy the diversity of music throughout the world by enabling them to creatively develop their knowledge, abilities, and understanding through performance and composition. Students will be expected to demonstrate their understanding of music by performing, by using appropriate musical language and terminology in analyzing musical works from many and varied cultures and periods, and by exploring music through composition.
    Music IB SL 2
    Credit Type: ART
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Department approval
    This course is designed for music students with varied backgrounds in music performance or composition. The aim of the IB music program is to give music students the opportunity to explore and enjoy the diversity of music throughout the world by enabling them to creatively develop their knowledge, abilities, and understanding through performance and composition. Students will be expected to demonstrate their understanding of music by performing, by using appropriate musical language and terminology in analyzing musical works from many and varied cultures and periods, and by exploring music through composition.
    Music IB HL 1
    Credit Type: ART
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Department approval
    This course is designed for music students with varied backgrounds in music performance or composition. The aim of the IB music program is to give music students the opportunity to explore and enjoy the diversity of music throughout the world by enabling them to creatively develop their knowledge, abilities, and understanding through performance and composition. Students will be expected to demonstrate their understanding of music by performing, by using appropriate musical language and terminology in analyzing musical works from many and varied cultures and periods, and by exploring music through composition.
    Music IB HL 2
    Credit Type: ART
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Department approval
    This course is designed for music students with varied backgrounds in music performance or composition. The aim of the IB music program is to give music students the opportunity to explore and enjoy the diversity of music throughout the world by enabling them to creatively develop their knowledge, abilities, and understanding through performance and composition. Students will be expected to demonstrate their understanding of music by performing, by using appropriate musical language and terminology in analyzing musical works from many and varied cultures and periods, and by exploring music through composition.
    Visual Arts IB SL 1
    Credit Type: ART
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Department approval
    The IB Diploma Programme visual arts course encourages students to challenge their own creative and cultural expectations and boundaries. It is a thought-provoking course in which students develop analytical skills in problem-solving and divergent thinking, while working towards technical proficiency and confidence as art-makers. In addition to exploring and comparing visual arts from different perspectives and in different contexts, students are expected to engage in, experiment with and critically reflect upon a wide range of contemporary practices and media. The course is designed for students who want to go on to study visual arts in higher education as well as for those who are seeking lifelong enrichment through visual arts.
    Visual Arts IB SL 2
    Credit Type: ART
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Department approval
    The IB Diploma Programme visual arts course encourages students to challenge their own creative and cultural expectations and boundaries. It is a thought-provoking course in which students develop analytical skills in problem-solving and divergent thinking, while working towards technical proficiency and confidence as art-makers. In addition to exploring and comparing visual arts from different perspectives and in different contexts, students are expected to engage in, experiment with and critically reflect upon a wide range of contemporary practices and media. The course is designed for students who want to go on to study visual arts in higher education as well as for those who are seeking lifelong enrichment through visual arts.
    Visual Arts IB HL 1
    Credit Type: ART
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Department approval
    The IB Diploma Programme visual arts course encourages students to challenge their own creative and cultural expectations and boundaries. It is a thought-provoking course in which students develop analytical skills in problem-solving and divergent thinking, while working towards technical proficiency and confidence as art-makers. In addition to exploring and comparing visual arts from different perspectives and in different contexts, students are expected to engage in, experiment with and critically reflect upon a wide range of contemporary practices and media. The course is designed for students who want to go on to study visual arts in higher education as well as for those who are seeking lifelong enrichment through visual arts.
    Visual Arts IB HL 2
    Credit Type: ART
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Department approval
    The IB Diploma Programme visual arts course encourages students to challenge their own creative and cultural expectations and boundaries. It is a thought-provoking course in which students develop analytical skills in problem-solving and divergent thinking, while working towards technical proficiency and confidence as art-makers. In addition to exploring and comparing visual arts from different perspectives and in different contexts, students are expected to engage in, experiment with and critically reflect upon a wide range of contemporary practices and media. The course is designed for students who want to go on to study visual arts in higher education as well as for those who are seeking lifelong enrichment through visual arts.
    Bell Choir
    Credit Type: ART
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): none
    Bell Choir is a course that is open to students interested in ringing. It is intended to enhance listening and performance skills in artistic renditions of bell music through kinesthetic, rhythmic, and interpretive accuracy. The Bell Choir performs at the major concerts during the school year and for invitational performances throughout Tokyo.
    Pencil Portfolio and Other 2D Mediums
    Credit Type: ART
    Credit Value: 0.5
    Prerequisite(s): none
    This will be the course for you to develop your 2D art skills. We will explore a variety of 2D mediums such as acrylics, watercolor, and oil pastels. An emphasis on critical analysis of art is also a large part of the course.
    Ceramics I
    Credit Type: ART
    Credit Value: 0.5
    Prerequisite(s): none
    A wide variety of ceramic wares will be explored using hand building techniques. 2-D surface design is an important aspect of this predominantly three dimensional medium. An additional emphasis on critical analysis of art is also a large part of the course.
    Ceramics II
    Credit Type: ART
    Credit Value: 0.5
    Prerequisite(s): none
    Ceramics II builds on skills and concepts from Ceramics I.
    Concert Band
    Credit Type: ART
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): none
    The Concert band is a two-semester ensemble for instrumentalists who have previous experience on a traditional band instrument. Continued emphasis is given to the development of musicianship and basic skills through a large repertoire of appropriate level band literature. Students perform several times throughout the year including the Christmas Concert, KPASSP Instrumental Festival, Spring Concert, and school assemblies.
    Acting
    Credit Type: ART
    Credit Value: 0.5
    Prerequisite(s): none
    This course provides opportunities for students to explore acting forms and techniques, using material from a wide range of sources and cultures. Students will use the elements of acting to examine situations and issues that are relevant to their lives. Students will create, perform, discuss, and analyse acting, and then reflect on the experiences to develop an understanding of themselves, the art form, and the world around them.
    Introduction to Art
    Credit Type: ART
    Credit Value: 0.5
    Prerequisite(s): none
    Introduction to Art will provide the necessary foundational art skills for the high school art program. Students will explore the 2D and 3D arts utilizing the basic elements and principles of design. The elements of art are: shape, value, colour, texture, line, form and space. The principles of design are: balance, contrast, emphasis, movement, pattern, rhythm, and unity.
    Jazz Band
    Credit Type: ART
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Instructor approval and audition may be required
    The Jazz Band is a two-semester auditioned ensemble that consists of select students from the concert band. Students will perform several times throughout the year at the Christmas and Spring concerts as well as the International Ball, Carnival, school assemblies, and international jazz festivals. Students involved in Jazz Band will perform with the Concert Band, regardless of enrollment in the Concert Band class. Students can, however, enroll in both courses.
    Men's Choir
    Credit Type: ART
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): none
    The Men's Choir is a two semester ensemble designed to provide continuing vocal instruction and general musicianship skills for choral students at different levels. Instruction will include continuing music literacy and music theory and will expose students to all types of music from baroque to contemporary popular styles. Students perform several times throughout the year including the Christmas Concert, KPASSP Choral Festival, SMA Luncheon, Spring Concert, Carnival, school assemblies and for community charity events.
    Music Explorations
    Credit Type: ART
    Credit Value: 0.5
    Prerequisite(s): none
    This introductory course to music will focus on the elements of music, fundamentals of reading music, exploration of music from various cultures and genres, popular music, film music, and the music industry.
    Varsity Ensemble
    Credit Type: ART
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Instructor approval and audition may be required
    This auditioned ensemble consists of a select group from the Men's Choir. Students perform several times throughout the year including the Christmas Concert, KPASSP Choral Festival, SMA Luncheon, Spring Concert, school assemblies, community charity events as well as international choral competitions and ACDA conventions.

    IB Courses

    Theory of Knowledge IB 1
    Credit Type: TOK
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): none
    Theory of Knowledge (TOK) is a core subject of the IB Diploma Programme for Juniors and Seniors and is a mandatory course for all IB candidates willing to earn the IB Diploma. TOK students investigate knowledge in all the various fields of human activity (Areas of Knowledge) through the prism of the methods and processes (Ways of Knowing) that help build, maintain, question, obliterate, as well as communicate knowledge. Students in TOK are invited to explore different problematic aspects of knowledge by learning how to formulate Knowledge Questions in order to enhance their reflection and by consolidating their analytical thinking skills. The subject is not content-based, but rather reflection-based and TOK students very soon realize that there is no definitive answer to a given problem, but rather a variety of perspectives that allow for new discoveries through presentations, class discussions, or activities aimed at triggering their curiosity.
    Theory of Knowledge IB 2
    Credit Type: TOK
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): none
    Theory of Knowledge (TOK) is a core subject of the IB Diploma Programme for Juniors and Seniors and is a mandatory course for all IB candidates willing to earn the IB Diploma. TOK students investigate knowledge in all the various fields of human activity (Areas of Knowledge) through the prism of the methods and processes (Ways of Knowing) that help build, maintain, question, obliterate, as well as communicate knowledge. Students in TOK are invited to explore different problematic aspects of knowledge by learning how to formulate Knowledge Questions in order to enhance their reflection and by consolidating their analytical thinking skills. The subject is not content-based, but rather reflection-based and TOK students very soon realize that there is no definitive answer to a given problem, but rather a variety of perspectives that allow for new discoveries through presentations, class discussions, or activities aimed at triggering their curiosity.
    CAS 11 IB
    Credit Type: NON
    Credit Value: 0
    Prerequisite(s): none
    None
    CAS 12 IB
    Credit Type: NON
    Credit Value: 0
    Prerequisite(s): none
    None

    Technology Courses

    Architecture
    Credit Type: ELEC
    Credit Value: 0.5
    Prerequisite(s): none
    None
    Design Technology III
    Credit Type: ELEC
    Credit Value: 0.5
    Prerequisite(s): none
    None
    Design Technology IV
    Credit Type: ELEC
    Credit Value: 0.5
    Prerequisite(s): none
    None
    Engineering and Robotics I
    Credit Type: ELEC
    Credit Value: 0.5
    Prerequisite(s): none
    None
    Engineering and Robotics II
    Credit Type: ELEC
    Credit Value: 0.5
    Prerequisite(s): none
    None
    Food Science
    Credit Type: ELEC
    Credit Value: 0.5
    Prerequisite(s): none
    None
    Comm Tech: Advanced Projects
    Credit Type: ELEC
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Comm Tech: Film, Audio and VFX OR Graphics and Animation
    Students will boost their Communications Technology skills in film, audio, and graphics to the next level. Working in partnership with the teacher, students will develop a customized course of study that focuses on their area of interest: film, audio, graphic design, game design, or any related media or technology. This subject requires students to develop skills in project empathy, scaffolding, goal setting, ongoing assessment, problem-solving, publishing, and sharing work. The core values of the course are energy, creativity, and resilience. The goal of this course is for a student to master a subject area of choice. This course is the culmination of the Communications Technology program. Thus, students will also learn common skills and values such as backing up work and choosing the best software package for a job. Prerequisite: One other Communications Technology or Design Technology class at the senior level.
    Comm Tech: Digital Photography I
    Credit Type: ELEC
    Credit Value: 0.5
    Prerequisite(s): none
    In this course, students develop their knowledge and skills as a photographer. Through many hands-on projects, they quickly move away from point and shoot and understand how to create stories with light. Students will learn how to choose a subject, determine the best distance and angle, manipulate focus, balance the exposure triangle, and use natural and artificial light to accomplish their purpose. Students will understand the technology of the camera. Students will also use Photoshop and Lightroom to edit and improve their work. This course is part of the Communications Technology continuum, so students will also learn common skills and values such as backing up work and choosing the best software package for a job.
    Comm Tech: Digital Photography II
    Credit Type: ELEC
    Credit Value: 0.5
    Prerequisite(s): Digital Photography I
    As motivated and experienced photographers, through hands-on projects and assignments, students will be challenged to take more professional and artistic photographs. Students will use Adobe Photoshop and Lightroom at advanced levels to edit their photos. Students will study a variety of different kinds and styles of photographs, including traditional forms such as portraits and sports photographs, and new forms such as 360 degree photos. Camera technology will be studied at a deeper level. A large component of this course will be in absorbing techniques and transmitting these to younger photographers. Emphasis will be placed on independent work and self-assessment. Students will be expected to produce work for the gallery show, online presentations, and the St. Mary's community. This course is part of the Communications Technology continuum, so students will also learn common skills and values such as backing up work and choosing the best software package for a job.
    Comm Tech: Film, Audio and VFX
    Credit Type: ELEC
    Credit Value: 0.5
    Prerequisite(s): none
    Students are introduced to the art of making film by applying cinematographic conventions and techniques to communicate their stories. Students will experience all phases of the production process including pre-production (storyboarding and screenwriting), shooting (camera skills), editing, post-production, showing, and distributing their films. Students will also create audio projects related to film, including foleying and ADR. Additionally, they will create a variety of VFX, including compositing, motion tracking, and creating particle systems. Students will follow industry standards and produce polished work. This course is part of the Communications Technology continuum, so students will also learn common skills and values such as backing up work and choosing the best software package for a job.
    Comm Tech: Graphics and Animation
    Credit Type: ELEC
    Credit Value: 0.5
    Prerequisite(s): none
    Students will develop an understanding principles of graphic design and learn skills required to create many different types of graphics. The focus of the course is vector graphics, but students will also experience 3D modeling and traditional animation. Students will learn transferable skills in three industry standard software package: Adobe Illustrator, Autodesk Maya and Opentoonz. Students will follow industry standards and produce polished work. Students will use the design process in creating their work, and emphasis will be on communicating with a target audience effectively. This course is part of the Communications Technology continuum, so students will also learn common skills and values such as backing up work and choosing the best software package for a job.
    Computer Science I
    Credit Type: ELEC
    Credit Value: 0.5
    Prerequisite(s): none
    This course introduces students to computer science. Students will design software and use subprograms independently and as part of a team, using industry-standard programming tools and applying the software development life-cycle model. Students will develop creative solutions for various types of problems and will also explore environmental, ergonomic issues, emerging research in computer science, and global career trends in computer-related fields.
    Embedded Systems I
    Credit Type: ELEC
    Credit Value: 0.5
    Prerequisite(s): none
    This course provides a basic introduction to microcontroller-based embedded systems design, development and implementation. Students will use the Arduino micro-controller in a progression of projects designed to teach elementary electronics, programming and I/O interfacing. These projects involve connecting a wide variety of hardware including LEDs, switches, resistors, motors, servos and then installing various sensors for autonomous control. Unlock your inner mad electrical genius!

    Language Arts

    English 9
    Credit Type: ENG
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): none
    Grade 9 English Language Arts provides students with the preparatory skills required for high school and IB English. Whilst students receive exposure to all of the language arts (listening, reading, speaking, and writing), the main focus of the course is to ensure students are able to articulate fluently and confidently in both written and verbal form. The course begins with a rigorous review of grammatical functions and vocabulary; following this, students spend equal time on both creative writing and literary analysis through the study of journalism, speeches, drama, and prose.
    English 10
    Credit Type: ENG
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): English 9
    English 10 is an IB preparatory course that focuses on increasing students' appreciation of the interactions of culture, language, and media, developing their listening and note-taking skills, improving their reading comprehension, and strengthening their composition skills. Students practice these skills through exposure to a variety of literary and non-literary forms and opportunities to critically think about and discuss them. Summative assessments are administered in both oral and written formats and include projects such as researched presentations or papers.
    English Studies 11
    Credit Type: ENG
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): English 10
    Grade 11 and Grade 12 English Studies are non-IB English courses that are not restricted by IB requirements and consequently have a greater flexibility in terms of works studied and methods of assessment. In addition. course materials may more readily be modified to accommodate individualized student needs and interests, as can the pacing of the instructional sequence over the life of the course. Writing-Across-the-Curriculum (WAC) is also utilized, but emphasis remains on the improvement of students' English proficiencies in all of the language arts: listening, speaking, reading, and writing.
    English Literature IB HL 1
    Credit Type: ENG
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): English 10 + Department approval
    English Literature 11/12 IB focuses on the study of literature and generating quality oral and written responses to it. It consists of four (4) semester-long blocks of study: Free Choice, Literature in Translation, Detailed Studies, and Genre Study. These four blocks may be sequenced as the teacher chooses, and each block entails its own special form of summative assessment. The summative assessment for Free Choice is an internally evaluated Oral Presentation; for Literature in Translation it is a Reflective Paper and a Written Assignment (Essay) both of which are externally evaluated by the IB; for Detailed Studies it is an Oral Examination internally evaluated but externally modulated; and for Genre Studies it is the Paper Two (2) portion of the Final Exam. The other portion of the Final Exam is a Written Commentary over a previously unseen text extract. Final Exams are externally moderated. Procedural emphasis is on students developing their critical thinking skills as they master literary concepts and terminology, apply them analytically, and incorporate them into a viable cognitive framework. The goal is to facilitate students' abilities to analyze, synthesize, and extrapolate from their readings to become better strategic listeners, readers, speakers, and writers. Higher Level participation involves more work and requires greater fluency in English than does Standard Level participation. English Literature 11 IB HL is followed by English Literature 12 IB HL. More information can be found following these Language A: literatureSL/HLlinks.
    English Literature IB SL 1
    Credit Type: ENG
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): English 10 + Department approval
    English Literature 11/12 IB focuses on the study of literature and generating quality oral and written responses to it. It consists of four (4) semester-long blocks of study: Free Choice, Literature in Translation, Detailed Studies, and Genre Study. These four blocks may be sequenced as the teacher chooses, and each block entails its own special form of summative assessment. The summative assessment for Free Choice is an internally evaluated Oral Presentation; for Literature in Translation it is a Reflective Paper and a Written Assignment (Essay) both of which are externally evaluated by the IB; for Detailed Studies it is an Oral Examination internally evaluated but externally modulated; and for Genre Studies it is the Paper Two (2) portion of the Final Exam. The other portion of the Final Exam is a Written Commentary over a previously unseen text extract. Final Exams are externally moderated. Procedural emphasis is on students developing their critical thinking skills as they master literary concepts and terminology, apply them analytically, and incorporate them into a viable cognitive framework. The goal is to facilitate students' abilities to analyze, synthesize, and extrapolate from their readings to become better strategic listeners, readers, speakers, and writers. Higher Level participation involves more work and requires greater fluency in English than does Standard Level participation. English Literature 11 IB HL is followed by English Literature 12 IB HL. More information can be found following these Language A: literatureSL/HLlinks.
    English Studies 12
    Credit Type: ENG
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): English 10
    Grade 11 and Grade 12 English Studies are non-IB English courses that are not restricted by IB requirements and consequently have a greater flexibility in terms of works studied and methods of assessment. In addition. course materials may more readily be modified to accommodate individualized student needs and interests, as can the pacing of the instructional sequence over the life of the course. Writing-Across-the-Curriculum (WAC) is also utilized, but emphasis remains on the improvement of students' English proficiencies in all of the language arts: listening, speaking, reading, and writing.
    English Language and Literature IB SL 1
    Credit Type: ENG
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): English 10 + Department approval
    The Language A: Language and Literature course aims to develop skills of textual analysis and the understanding that texts, both literary and non-literary, can relate to culturally determined reading practices, and to encourage students to question the meaning generated by language and texts. An understanding of the ways in which formal elements are used to create meaning in a text is combined with an exploration of how that meaning is affected by reading practices that are culturally defined and by the circumstances of production and reception. Helping students to focus closely on the language of studied texts and to become aware of the role of wider context in shaping meaning is central to the course. The study of literature in translation from other cultures is especially important to IB DP students because it contributes to a global perspective. Texts are chosen from a variety of sources, genres and media. More information can be found following these Language A: Language and Literature SL/HL links.
    English Language and Literature IB SL 2
    Credit Type: ENG
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): English 10 + Department approval
    The Language A: Language and Literature course aims to develop skills of textual analysis and the understanding that texts, both literary and non-literary, can relate to culturally determined reading practices, and to encourage students to question the meaning generated by language and texts. An understanding of the ways in which formal elements are used to create meaning in a text is combined with an exploration of how that meaning is affected by reading practices that are culturally defined and by the circumstances of production and reception. Helping students to focus closely on the language of studied texts and to become aware of the role of wider context in shaping meaning is central to the course. The study of literature in translation from other cultures is especially important to IB DP students because it contributes to a global perspective. Texts are chosen from a variety of sources, genres and media. More information can be found following these Language A: Language and Literature SL/HL links.
    English Language and Literature IB HL 1
    Credit Type: ENG
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): English 10 + Department approval
    The Language A: Language and Literature course aims to develop skills of textual analysis and the understanding that texts, both literary and non-literary, can relate to culturally determined reading practices, and to encourage students to question the meaning generated by language and texts. An understanding of the ways in which formal elements are used to create meaning in a text is combined with an exploration of how that meaning is affected by reading practices that are culturally defined and by the circumstances of production and reception. Helping students to focus closely on the language of studied texts and to become aware of the role of wider context in shaping meaning is central to the course. The study of literature in translation from other cultures is especially important to IB DP students because it contributes to a global perspective. Texts are chosen from a variety of sources, genres and media. More information can be found following these Language A: Language and Literature SL/HL links.
    English Language and Literature IB HL 2
    Credit Type: ENG
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): English 10 + Department approval
    The Language A: Language and Literature course aims to develop skills of textual analysis and the understanding that texts, both literary and non-literary, can relate to culturally determined reading practices, and to encourage students to question the meaning generated by language and texts. An understanding of the ways in which formal elements are used to create meaning in a text is combined with an exploration of how that meaning is affected by reading practices that are culturally defined and by the circumstances of production and reception. Helping students to focus closely on the language of studied texts and to become aware of the role of wider context in shaping meaning is central to the course. The study of literature in translation from other cultures is especially important to IB DP students because it contributes to a global perspective. Texts are chosen from a variety of sources, genres and media. More information can be found following these Language A: Language and Literature SL/HL links.
    English Literature IB SL 2
    Credit Type: ENG
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): English 10 + Department approval
    English Literature 11/12 IB focuses on the study of literature and generating quality oral and written responses to it. It consists of four (4) semester-long blocks of study: Free Choice, Literature in Translation, Detailed Studies, and Genre Study. These four blocks may be sequenced as the teacher chooses, and each block entails its own special form of summative assessment. The summative assessment for Free Choice is an internally evaluated Oral Presentation; for Literature in Translation it is a Reflective Paper and a Written Assignment (Essay) both of which are externally evaluated by the IB; for Detailed Studies it is an Oral Examination internally evaluated but externally modulated; and for Genre Studies it is the Paper Two (2) portion of the Final Exam. The other portion of the Final Exam is a Written Commentary over a previously unseen text extract. Final Exams are externally moderated. Procedural emphasis is on students developing their critical thinking skills as they master literary concepts and terminology, apply them analytically, and incorporate them into a viable cognitive framework. The goal is to facilitate students' abilities to analyze, synthesize, and extrapolate from their readings to become better strategic listeners, readers, speakers, and writers. Higher Level participation involves more work and requires greater fluency in English than does Standard Level participation. English Literature 11 IB HL is followed by English Literature 12 IB HL. More information can be found following these Language A: literatureSL/HLlinks.
    English Literature IB HL 2
    Credit Type: ENG
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): English 10 + Department approval
    English Literature 11/12 IB focuses on the study of literature and generating quality oral and written responses to it. It consists of four (4) semester-long blocks of study: Free Choice, Literature in Translation, Detailed Studies, and Genre Study. These four blocks may be sequenced as the teacher chooses, and each block entails its own special form of summative assessment. The summative assessment for Free Choice is an internally evaluated Oral Presentation; for Literature in Translation it is a Reflective Paper and a Written Assignment (Essay) both of which are externally evaluated by the IB; for Detailed Studies it is an Oral Examination internally evaluated but externally modulated; and for Genre Studies it is the Paper Two (2) portion of the Final Exam. The other portion of the Final Exam is a Written Commentary over a previously unseen text extract. Final Exams are externally moderated. Procedural emphasis is on students developing their critical thinking skills as they master literary concepts and terminology, apply them analytically, and incorporate them into a viable cognitive framework. The goal is to facilitate students' abilities to analyze, synthesize, and extrapolate from their readings to become better strategic listeners, readers, speakers, and writers. Higher Level participation involves more work and requires greater fluency in English than does Standard Level participation. English Literature 11 IB HL is followed by English Literature 12 IB HL. More information can be found following these Language A: literatureSL/HLlinks.
    Journalism
    Credit Type: ELEC
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): none
    The St. Mary's Student newspaper, the Diplomat, is a yearlong course which operates as a mock newsroom with Senior Editors, Junior Editors, Desk Editors, Reporters, Photographers, and Tech Support positions at which students may be assigned work based on their interests and publication needs. It is a student-led and collaborative production process focused on creating a high quality student newspaper and newspaper website. Primary avenues of assessment are work logs, which document student activity, and portfolios, which contain student work process products.
    Literature as Film
    Credit Type: ELEC
    Credit Value: 0.5
    Prerequisite(s): none
    Do you like literature? Do you like movies? Do you like movies based on literature? Then this is the class for you! During this course, students will read, discuss, and write about a variety of short stories and novels that have been transformed into films. The writings will focus on the differences that exist between the texts and the impact these differences have upon meaning. Along with this, the student will learn film terminology, how to adapt literature into a screenplay, and develop an understanding of the complications and criticisms involved in the process. The course will end with students adapting a literary text into a movie script and possibly the creation of their own film.
    English 12
    Credit Type: ENG
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): none
    None

    Mathematics

    Mathematics 9
    Credit Type: MAT
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): none
    This course enables students to develop an understanding of mathematical concepts related to functions, analytic geometry, and patterns in shape, data, and chance. Students will develop, select, apply, and compare a variety of problem-solving strategies as they pose and solve problems and conduct investigations, to help deepen their mathematical understanding. They will also develop and apply reasoning skills to make mathematical conjectures, assess conjectures, and justify conclusions, and plan and construct organized mathematical arguments, and will demonstrate that they are reflecting on and monitoring their thinking to help clarify their understanding as they complete an investigation or solve a problem. Students will communicate mathematical thinking orally, visually, and in writing, using mathematical vocabulary and a variety of appropriate representations, and observing mathematical conventions. The topics covered in Mathematics 9 are a subset of those covered in Mathematics 9 - Extended. The intention is provide students additional time to develop and master mathematical processes and skills as well as to develop a deeper understanding of mathematical concepts.
    Mathematics 9 - Extended
    Credit Type: MAT
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): none
    This course enables students to develop an understanding of mathematical concepts related to functions, analytic geometry, trigonometry, data and probability. Students will develop, select, apply, and compare a variety of problem-solving strategies as they pose and solve problems and conduct investigations, to help deepen their mathematical understanding. They will also develop and apply reasoning skills to make mathematical conjectures, assess conjectures, and justify conclusions, and plan and construct organized mathematical arguments, and will demonstrate that they are reflecting on and monitoring their thinking to help clarify their understanding as they complete an investigation or solve a problem. Students will communicate mathematical thinking orally, visually, and in writing, using mathematical vocabulary and a variety of appropriate representations, and observing mathematical conventions
    Integrated Mathematics - Advanced 10
    Credit Type: MAT
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Mathematics 9
    none on file
    Integrated Mathematics 10
    Credit Type: MAT
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Mathematics 9
    none on file
    Integrated Mathematics 9
    Credit Type: MAT
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): none
    none on file
    Integrated Mathematics 9 (Hons)
    Credit Type: MAT
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): none
    none on file
    Mathematics 10
    Credit Type: MAT
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Mathematics 9
    This course enables students to develop an understanding of mathematical concepts related to functions, analytic geometry, and patterns in shape, data, and chance. Students will develop, select, apply, and compare a variety of problem-solving strategies as they pose and solve problems and conduct investigations, to help deepen their mathematical understanding. They will also develop and apply reasoning skills to make mathematical conjectures, assess conjectures, and justify conclusions, and plan and construct organized mathematical arguments, and will demonstrate that they are reflecting on and monitoring their thinking to help clarify their understanding as they complete an investigation or solve a problem. Students will communicate mathematical thinking orally, visually, and in writing, using mathematical vocabulary and a variety of appropriate representations, and observing mathematical conventions. The topics covered in Mathematics 9 are a subset of those covered in Mathematics 9 - Extended. The intention is provide students additional time to develop and master mathematical processes and skills as well as to develop a deeper understanding of mathematical concepts.
    Mathematics 10 - Extended
    Credit Type: MAT
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Mathematics 9 - Extended
    This course enables students to develop an understanding of mathematical concepts related to functions, analytic geometry, trigonometry, data and probability. Students will develop, select, apply, and compare a variety of problem-solving strategies as they pose and solve problems and conduct investigations, to help deepen their mathematical understanding. They will also develop and apply reasoning skills to make mathematical conjectures, assess conjectures, and justify conclusions, and plan and construct organized mathematical arguments, and will demonstrate that they are reflecting on and monitoring their thinking to help clarify their understanding as they complete an investigation or solve a problem. Students will communicate mathematical thinking orally, visually, and in writing, using mathematical vocabulary and a variety of appropriate representations, and observing mathematical conventions
    Algebra II 10 (Hons)
    Credit Type: MAT
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Mathematics 9
    none on file
    Math Studies 11
    Credit Type: MAT
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Mathematics 10
    These courses are primarily intended for students who do not aim to take mathematics courses in their college studies. The focus of these courses is to provide students with the necessary skills and insight into a wide range of the mathematical applications that they are likely to encounter in later years through their studies and experiences in other disciplines. In the grade 11 class, students will cover: Number and Algebra, Descriptive Statistics, Statistical Applications, Geometry and Trigonometry, Mathematical Models. In the grade 12 class, students will cover: Introduction to Differential Calculus, Logic, Sets and Probability.
    Math Studies 12
    Credit Type: MAT
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Mathematics 10
    These courses are primarily intended for students who do not aim to take mathematics courses in their college studies. The focus of these courses is to provide students with the necessary skills and insight into a wide range of the mathematical applications that they are likely to encounter in later years through their studies and experiences in other disciplines. In the grade 11 class, students will cover: Number and Algebra, Descriptive Statistics, Statistical Applications, Geometry and Trigonometry, Mathematical Models. In the grade 12 class, students will cover: Introduction to Differential Calculus, Logic, Sets and Probability.
    Math: Analysis & Approaches IB HL 2
    Credit Type: MAT
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Mathematics 10 + Department approval
    The new IB math program will first be offered in August 2019
    Math: Analysis & Approaches IB SL 2
    Credit Type: MAT
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Mathematics 10 + Department approval
    The new IB math program will first be offered in August 2019
    Math: Applications & Interpret. IB HL 2
    Credit Type: MAT
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Mathematics 10 + Department approval
    The new IB math program will first be offered in August 2019
    Math: Applications & Interpret. IB SL 2
    Credit Type: MAT
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Mathematics 10 + Department approval
    The new IB math program will first be offered in August 2019
    Mathematical Studies IB SL 1
    Credit Type: MAT
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Mathematics 10 + Department approval
    This course aims to provide students with adequate background in all the main areas of number and algebra, sets and logic, geometry and trigonometry, statistics and probability, functions, financial mathematics, introductory differential calculus. It is primarily intended for students who do not aim to take mathematics in their college studies. The focus of the course is to provide students with the necessary skills and insight into a wide range of the mathematical applications that they are likely to encounter in later years through their studies and experiences in other disciplines. Those candidates who opt to sit the IB Mathematical Studies examination will also be required to complete a project in Grade 12 related to some mathematical application of their choice.
    Mathematics IB HL 1
    Credit Type: MAT
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Mathematics 10 + Department approval
    The course is intended for strong mathematics students who may intend to study mathematics, engineering or the sciences at college or university. The core topics include number and algebra, functions and equations, circular functions and trigonometry, vector geometry, matrices and transformations, statistics, probability, and calculus. In the senior year students will also study one or two option topics chosen from discrete mathematics, sets relations and groups, statistics and probability, series and differential equations. At the end of the course students sit an externally-assessed examination and must submit a portfolio of two pieces of internally assessed coursework made up of one mathematical investigations and one mathematical modeling assignment gathered over the two years.
    Mathematics IB SL 1
    Credit Type: MAT
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Mathematics 10 + Department approval
    The course is intended for strong mathematics students who may intend to study mathematics, engineering or the sciences at college or university. The core topics include number and algebra, functions and equations, circular functions and trigonometry, vector geometry, matrices and transformations, statistics, probability, and calculus. In the senior year students will also study one or two option topics chosen from discrete mathematics, sets relations and groups, statistics and probability, series and differential equations. At the end of the course students sit an externally-assessed examination and must submit a portfolio of two pieces of internally assessed coursework made up of one mathematical investigations and one mathematical modeling assignment gathered over the two years.
    Mathematical Studies IB SL 2
    Credit Type: MAT
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Mathematics 10 + Department approval
    This course enables students to broaden their understanding of relationships and extend their problem-solving and algebraic skills through investigation, the effective use of technology, and abstract reasoning. Students will work with nonlinear and inverse functions. They will be introduced to recursion and iteration, reasoning and proof, trigonometric methods, similarity and congruence, and probability distributions. The topics covered in Mathematics 9 are a subset of those covered in Mathematics 9 - Extended and 10 - Extended. The intention is provide students additional time to develop and master mathematical processes and skills as well as to develop a deeper understanding of mathematical concepts. The course is intended to adequately prepare students for what is to come in the IB Diploma Programme and to help them make the appropriate course selection between Analysis and Approaches SL or Applications and Interpretations SL. This course enables students to broaden their understanding of relationships and extend their problem-solving and algebraic skills through investigation, the effective use of technology, and abstract reasoning. Students will work with nonlinear, inverse, polynomial, rational, and circular functions as well as families of functions. They will be introduced to recursion and iteration, reasoning and proof, vectors and motion, and samples and variation. The course is intended to adequately prepare students for what is to come in the IB Diploma Programme and to help them make the appropriate course selection between Analysis and Approaches or Applications and Interpretations and determine the appropriate level.
    Mathematics IB SL 2
    Credit Type: MAT
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Mathematics 10 + Department approval
    The course is intended for strong mathematics students who may intend to study mathematics, engineering or the sciences at college or university. The core topics include number and algebra, functions and equations, circular functions and trigonometry, vector geometry, matrices and transformations, statistics, probability, and calculus. In the senior year students will also study one or two option topics chosen from discrete mathematics, sets relations and groups, statistics and probability, series and differential equations. At the end of the course students sit an externally-assessed examination and must submit a portfolio of two pieces of internally assessed coursework made up of one mathematical investigations and one mathematical modeling assignment gathered over the two years. More information can be found following these Mathematics SL/HL links.
    Mathematics IB HL 2
    Credit Type: MAT
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Mathematics 10 + Department approval
    The course is intended for strong mathematics students who may intend to study mathematics, engineering or the sciences at college or university. The core topics include number and algebra, functions and equations, circular functions and trigonometry, vector geometry, matrices and transformations, statistics, probability, and calculus. In the senior year students will also study one or two option topics chosen from discrete mathematics, sets relations and groups, statistics and probability, series and differential equations. At the end of the course students sit an externally-assessed examination and must submit a portfolio of two pieces of internally assessed coursework made up of one mathematical investigations and one mathematical modeling assignment gathered over the two years. More information can be found following these Mathematics SL/HL links.
    Math: Analysis & Approaches IB SL 1
    Credit Type: MAT
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Mathematics 10 + Department approval
    This course recognizes the need for analytical expertise in a world where innovation is increasingly dependent on a deep understanding of mathematics. This course includes topics that are both traditionally part of a pre-university mathematics course (for example, functions, trigonometry, calculus) as well as topics that are amenable to investigation, conjecture and proof, for instance the study of sequences and series at both SL and HL, and proof by induction at HL. The course allows the use of technology, as fluency in relevant mathematical software and handheld technology is important regardless of choice of course. However, Mathematics: analysis and approaches has a strong emphasis on the ability to construct, communicate and justify correct mathematical arguments. Students who choose Mathematics: analysis and approaches at SL or HL should be comfortable in the manipulation of algebraic expressions and enjoy the recognition of patterns and understand the mathematical generalization of these patterns. Students who wish to take Mathematics: analysis and approaches at higher level will have strong algebraic skills and the ability to understand simple proof. They will be students who enjoy spending time with problems and get pleasure and satisfaction from solving challenging problems.
    Math: Analysis & Approaches IB HL 1
    Credit Type: MAT
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Mathematics 10 + Department approval
    This course recognizes the need for analytical expertise in a world where innovation is increasingly dependent on a deep understanding of mathematics. This course includes topics that are both traditionally part of a pre-university mathematics course (for example, functions, trigonometry, calculus) as well as topics that are amenable to investigation, conjecture and proof, for instance the study of sequences and series at both SL and HL, and proof by induction at HL. The course allows the use of technology, as fluency in relevant mathematical software and handheld technology is important regardless of choice of course. However, Mathematics: analysis and approaches has a strong emphasis on the ability to construct, communicate and justify correct mathematical arguments. Students who choose Mathematics: analysis and approaches at SL or HL should be comfortable in the manipulation of algebraic expressions and enjoy the recognition of patterns and understand the mathematical generalization of these patterns. Students who wish to take Mathematics: analysis and approaches at higher level will have strong algebraic skills and the ability to understand simple proof. They will be students who enjoy spending time with problems and get pleasure and satisfaction from solving challenging problems.
    Math: Applications & Interpret. IB SL 1
    Credit Type: MAT
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Mathematics 10 + Department approval
    This course recognizes the increasing role that mathematics and technology play in a diverse range of fields in a data-rich world. As such, it emphasizes the meaning of mathematics in context by focusing on topics that are often used as applications or in mathematical modeling. To give this understanding a firm base, this course also includes topics that are traditionally part of a pre-university mathematics course such as calculus and statistics. The course makes extensive use of technology to allow students to explore and construct mathematical models. Mathematics: applications and interpretation will develop mathematical thinking, often in the context of a practical problem and using technology to justify conjectures. Students who choose Mathematics: applications and interpretation at SL or HL should enjoy seeing mathematics used in real-world contexts and to solve real-world problems. Students who wish to take Mathematics: applications and interpretation at higher level will have good algebraic skills and experience of solving real-world problems. They will be students who get pleasure and satisfaction when exploring challenging problems and who are comfortable to undertake this exploration using technology.
    Math: Applications & Interpret. IB HL 1
    Credit Type: MAT
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Mathematics 10 + Department approval
    This course recognizes the increasing role that mathematics and technology play in a diverse range of fields in a data-rich world. As such, it emphasizes the meaning of mathematics in context by focusing on topics that are often used as applications or in mathematical modeling. To give this understanding a firm base, this course also includes topics that are traditionally part of a pre-university mathematics course such as calculus and statistics. The course makes extensive use of technology to allow students to explore and construct mathematical models. Mathematics: applications and interpretation will develop mathematical thinking, often in the context of a practical problem and using technology to justify conjectures. Students who choose Mathematics: applications and interpretation at SL or HL should enjoy seeing mathematics used in real-world contexts and to solve real-world problems. Students who wish to take Mathematics: applications and interpretation at higher level will have good algebraic skills and experience of solving real-world problems. They will be students who get pleasure and satisfaction when exploring challenging problems and who are comfortable to undertake this exploration using technology.

    Other

    Supervised Study Period
    Credit Type: NON
    Credit Value: 0
    Prerequisite(s): none
    The supervised study period is an opportunity for students to spend time with a qualified teacher to work on class requirements and develop writing skills.
    Futures Academy
    Credit Type: ELEC
    Credit Value: 0.5
    Prerequisite(s): none
    The SMIS Futures Academy course gives students an independent, solution focused program that allows individuals to take responsibility for their learning. Futures Academy gives students an opportunity to pursue personal interests that suit their individual learning style. With supervisor support, the participant will determine the learning goals and the criteria for success. The student begins with a proposal that links pre-existing knowledge to a topic for specialization. Specific goals are set to direct the acquisition specific skills and understandings. Students then self-direct their learning to meet goals and evaluate their own performance. Futures Academy helps students become flexible, self-reliant problem solvers.
    Yearbook
    Credit Type: ELEC
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): none
    This course requires intensive work to produce the school yearbook. It covers the fundamentals of layout, graphics, photography, composition, and editorial skills. Students are encouraged to examine and explore these concepts as they apply to their publication efforts and to use them in creating an expressive, interesting, and well-organized yearbook.

    Physical Education

    Physical Education
    Credit Type: PE
    Credit Value: 0.5
    Prerequisite(s): none
    Physical Education emphasizes active participation in a variety of activities that promote lifelong healthy active living. Students will learn movement skills and training principles, ways to improve personal fitness, physical competence, and safety. Units within the course fall under the following categories: Interactive Activities (e.g. team building), Physical Fitness (e.g. fitness testing, training), Large and Small Group Activities (e.g. team sports and games), and Individual Body Management Activities (e.g. individual sports and yoga).
    Strength and Movement
    Credit Type: PE
    Credit Value: 0.5
    Prerequisite(s): none
    Strength and Movement focuses on helping students become aware of basic human movement patterns as they relate to improvements in health-related fitness, especially muscular strength. They will gain the basic knowledge, understanding, and skills to independently and safely engage in resistance training. Students will be taught to perform compound, multi-joint movements and how principles of training are applied in a strength training program. There will also be some emphasis on human surface anatomy, planes of movement, and exercise selection.

    Religion and Ethics

    Business Ethics
    Credit Type: ETH
    Credit Value: 0.5
    Prerequisite(s): none
    Business Ethics is a semester course that explores ethical issues present in today’s world of business. Students evaluate ethical dilemmas that arise from business practices through case studies and applying traditional and contemporary ethical theories. Issues that are investigated include topics such as: values, globalization, social responsibility, environmental responsibility, and economic responsibility, the triple bottom line of sustainability, and CSR (corporate social responsibility).
    Catholic II: Scripture and Pop Culture
    Credit Type: ETH
    Credit Value: 0.5
    Prerequisite(s): Catholic I
    St. Jerome said, 'Ignorance of Scripture is ignorance of Christ. In this semester class, we will study Sacred Scripture and Salvation History. The student will learn the origins and history of the Bible and learn to interpret Scripture the Catholic way. In the tradition of the Church, we will search for God in all things- including Pop Culture. We will analyze when the culture expresses the Good News, and when it does not. Our study will enable us to evaluate and be critical of our culture from a Catholic perspective. The student will come to understand the Bible and be encouraged to integrate Scriptural lessons into his own life. This class will use Sacred Scripture, scriptural study guides, mass media, feature-length movies, novels, and current events. A variety of lectures, class-room discussiosn, videos, and in-class writing evaluations will be used. Methods of evaluation include quizzes, tests, presentations, papers, and group projects.
    Ethics & Virtues in the Natural Sciences
    Credit Type: ETH
    Credit Value: 0.5
    Prerequisite(s): none
    This course focuses on natural sciences based ethics issues in areas such as Natural Law, Beginning of Life Bio-ethics, End-of-Life Bioethics, Stem cell research, Genetic Enhancement, Human Sexuality, AI and Catholic Anthropology. Through case studies, discussion, lecture, films, research, and oral presentations, students will learn to apply a systematic framework to examine complex moral and ethical issues that are influenced by developments in biotechnology and science. Students will also be introduced to the Catholic teaching on morality and specific moral issues. Ethics is translated from the Greek word, ethos, that means habit or character. 'Vir' is Latin for man and the root of the word Virtue. Join this class to learn about the Morals, Ethics, and Virtues that are necessary to live the Good Life. Through the thoughts and teachings of classical philosophers like Aristotle, St. Augustine, and St Thomas Aquinas, we will study what we need to "Esto Vir"- Be a Man. Methods of evaluation include quizzes, tests, essays, research papers, and class participation
    Ethics & Virtues in the Social Sciences
    Credit Type: ETH
    Credit Value: 0.5
    Prerequisite(s): none
    This course focuses on social sciences based ethics issues in areas such as Natural Law, Catholic Social Teaching, Corporate Business Ethics, Global Economic Ethics, Crime and Punishment, Just War Doctrine, Ecology, and the Common Good. Through case studies, discussion, lecture, films, research, and oral presentations, students will learn to apply a systematic framework to examine moral problems in their personal lives and in society. Students will also be introduced to the Catholic teaching on morality and specific moral issues. Ethics is translated from the Greek word, ethos, that means habit or character. 'Vir' is Latin for man and the root of the word Virtue. Join this class to learn about the Morals, Ethics, and Virtues that are necessary to live the Good Life. Through the thoughts and teachings of classical philosophers like Aristotle, St. Augustine, and St Thomas Aquinas, we will study what we need to "Esto Vir"- Be a Man. Methods of evaluation include quizzes, tests, essays, research papers, and class participation.
    Catholic I: Intro to Catholicism
    Credit Type: ETH
    Credit Value: 0.5
    Prerequisite(s): none
    This semester long class will introduce the student to the beauty, depth, and universal truths of Catholicism, and its grounding in Reason and Faith. The student will reflect on his own life and the life of the Church to help him grow in the virtues of Faith, Hope, and Love. This course will explore the philosophical and metaphysical proofs for God, the reality of Jesus Christ, the formation of the early Church and its role and contributions throughout history, selected readings from Sacred Scripture, and the presence of the Gospels in popular culture. Methods of instruction include lectures, readings, documentaries, and pop culture multimedia.Methods of evaluation include quizzes, tests, essays, research papers, and class participation.

    Social Studies

    Western World History 9
    Credit Type: SOC
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): none
    Western World History is a chronological survey of world history from the Renaissance to the end of World War II. Although European developments predominate, ample attention is paid to the non-European aspects of world history. Particular emphasis is paid to the evolution of the connectivity of the four world zones and the exchange of ideas, people, disease, and goods. The relationship between the Americas and Afro-Eurasia is of central importance. Links are also made between historical events to modern-day world affairs. The course focuses on the effect of the contact between cultures, social and political change, economic development, the influence of geography on human history, the growth of science and technology, the growth of collective knowledge, as well as the rapidly increasing interconnectivity of the modern world. Western World History will introduce, reinforce and extend basic skills in the social sciences. The course will address understanding the chronological order of history, identifying cause and effect relationships, distinguishing fact from opinion, developing investigative skills, annotating and using primary and secondary sources, thinking critically, presenting knowledge in a variety of manners, and effectively communicating and collaborating with others.
    Eastern Civilizations 10
    Credit Type: SOC
    Credit Value: 0.5
    Prerequisite(s): Western World History 9
    Eastern Civilizations is a one semester course that explores important historical topics in the histories of China, Korea, India, and Japan. Historical topics include: Geography of Asia, Asian Religions and Their Cultures, Asian Political and Social Structures, Christianity in Asia, the Transpacific Economy, and Imperialism in Asia. The course emphasizes close-reading strategies for information text. Students will apply their understanding of key historical concepts (cause and consequence, change and continuity, perspectives, and significance) to answer Document Based-Questions (DBQs) and Long Essay Questions (LEQs). Students will also research a historical subject of their choice, which is related to the course syllabus, for the purposes of devising an answerable historical research question and an essay outline. Analysis, compare and contrast, discussion, evaluation, and examination are the 'command terms' for this course and are meant to develop historical thinking skills.
    Economics, Finance and Bus. Studies 10
    Credit Type: SOC
    Credit Value: 0.5
    Prerequisite(s): Western World History 9
    This one semester course is designed to provide students with an introduction to the basic principles of economics, finance and business studies. Students will develop an understanding of the concepts of demand and supply and how the price mechanism and markets function. Students will also be introduced to the principles of macroeconomics, business theory, entrepreneurship, and learn how firms are established and managed. The course may also cover selected topics in marketing and basic finance. The case study approach and role simulation will be utilized to enhance the students' understanding and appreciation of business.
    20th Century World History IB SL
    Credit Type: SOC
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Eastern Civilizations 10 + Department approval
    This is a one year course aimed at completing the requirement for IB History SL. History IB students study the major cultural, socio-economic, and historical trends related to the Cause and Effects of 20th Century Wars, Single Party and Authoritarian States, and the Road to War to complete the syllabus requirement for writing the SL exam in the first year. Assessment will include a variety of assignment including an Internal Assessment and culminate with exams in May: Paper 1, 2. This course emphasizes college-level discussion about historical topics in the syllabus, so students who select this class are expected to stay consistently dedicated and focused throughout the source of study. More information can be found following this History SL link.
    20th Century World History IB HL 1
    Credit Type: SOC
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Eastern Civilizations 10 + Department approval
    History of Asia and Oceania IB HL students study the major cultural, socio-economic, and historical trends related to the Modernization of Asia, Modern Japan, and the People's Republic of China. Assessment will include a variety of assignments including an Internal Assessment and culminate with exams in May: Paper 1, 2 (from the previous year's content, History IB SL) along with Paper 3 (HL content). This course is equivalent to a first year college history course, so students who select this class are expected to stay consistently dedicated and focused throughout the course of study. More information can be found following this History HL link.
    20th Century World History IB HL 2
    Credit Type: SOC
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Eastern Civilizations 10 + Department approval
    History of Asia and Oceania IB HL students study the major cultural, socio-economic, and historical trends related to the Modernization of Asia, Modern Japan, and the People's Republic of China. Assessment will include a variety of assignments including an Internal Assessment and culminate with exams in May: Paper 1, 2 (from the previous year's content, History IB SL) along with Paper 3 (HL content). This course is equivalent to a first year college history course, so students who select this class are expected to stay consistently dedicated and focused throughout the course of study. More information can be found following this History HL link.
    Psychology IB SL 1
    Credit Type: SOC
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Department approval
    The IB Diploma Programme standard level psychology course aims to develop an awareness of how research findings can be applied to better understand human behaviour and how ethical practices are upheld in psychological inquiry. Students learn to understand the biological, cognitive and sociocultural influences on human behaviour and explore alternative explanations of behaviour. They also understand and use diverse methods of psychological inquiry.
    Economics IB SL 1
    Credit Type: SOC
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Economics, Finance and Business Studies 10 + Department approval
    Economics is a dynamic social science. The study of economics is essentially about dealing with scarcity, resource allocation and the methods and processes by which choices are made in the satisfaction of human wants. As a social science, economics uses scientific methodologies that include quantitative and qualitative elements. The DP economics course emphasizes the economic theories of microeconomics, which deal with economic variables affecting individuals, firms and markets, and the economic theories of macroeconomics, which deal with economic variables affecting countries, governments and societies. These economic theories are not studied in a vacuum— rather, they are to be applied to real-world issues. Prominent among these issues are fluctuations in economic activity, international trade, economic development and environmental sustainability. The economics course encourages students to develop international perspectives, fosters a concern for global issues and raises students’ awareness of their own responsibilities at a local, national and international level. Teachers explicitly teach thinking and research skills such as comprehension, text analysis, transfer, and use of primary sources.
    Economics IB SL 2
    Credit Type: SOC
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Economics, Finance and Business Studies 10 + Department approval
    Economics is a dynamic social science. The study of economics is essentially about dealing with scarcity, resource allocation and the methods and processes by which choices are made in the satisfaction of human wants. As a social science, economics uses scientific methodologies that include quantitative and qualitative elements. The DP economics course emphasizes the economic theories of microeconomics, which deal with economic variables affecting individuals, firms and markets, and the economic theories of macroeconomics, which deal with economic variables affecting countries, governments and societies. These economic theories are not studied in a vacuum— rather, they are to be applied to real-world issues. Prominent among these issues are fluctuations in economic activity, international trade, economic development and environmental sustainability. The economics course encourages students to develop international perspectives, fosters a concern for global issues and raises students’ awareness of their own responsibilities at a local, national and international level. Teachers explicitly teach thinking and research skills such as comprehension, text analysis, transfer, and use of primary sources.
    Economics IB HL 1
    Credit Type: SOC
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Economics, Finance and Business Studies 10 + Department approval
    Economics is a dynamic social science. The study of economics is essentially about dealing with scarcity, resource allocation and the methods and processes by which choices are made in the satisfaction of human wants. As a social science, economics uses scientific methodologies that include quantitative and qualitative elements. The DP economics course emphasizes the economic theories of microeconomics, which deal with economic variables affecting individuals, firms and markets, and the economic theories of macroeconomics, which deal with economic variables affecting countries, governments and societies. These economic theories are not studied in a vacuum— rather, they are to be applied to real-world issues. Prominent among these issues are fluctuations in economic activity, international trade, economic development and environmental sustainability. The economics course encourages students to develop international perspectives, fosters a concern for global issues and raises students’ awareness of their own responsibilities at a local, national and international level. Teachers explicitly teach thinking and research skills such as comprehension, text analysis, transfer, and use of primary sources.
    Economics IB HL 2
    Credit Type: SOC
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Economics, Finance and Business Studies 10 + Department approval
    Economics is a dynamic social science. The study of economics is essentially about dealing with scarcity, resource allocation and the methods and processes by which choices are made in the satisfaction of human wants. As a social science, economics uses scientific methodologies that include quantitative and qualitative elements. The DP economics course emphasizes the economic theories of microeconomics, which deal with economic variables affecting individuals, firms and markets, and the economic theories of macroeconomics, which deal with economic variables affecting countries, governments and societies. These economic theories are not studied in a vacuum— rather, they are to be applied to real-world issues. Prominent among these issues are fluctuations in economic activity, international trade, economic development and environmental sustainability. The economics course encourages students to develop international perspectives, fosters a concern for global issues and raises students’ awareness of their own responsibilities at a local, national and international level. Teachers explicitly teach thinking and research skills such as comprehension, text analysis, transfer, and use of primary sources.
    Psychology and Human Behavior
    Credit Type: SOC
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): none
    Human Psychology is designed to provide a comprehensive overview of the scientific study of human thought and behavior. We will examine the history of psychology as well as its research methodologies. We will explore topics such as perception, human development, abnormal behavior, learning and thinking, social behavior, personality, dreams, and gender and sexuality.
    Info. Tech. in a Global Society IB SL 1
    Credit Type: SOC
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Department approval
    The IB DP information technology in a global society (ITGS) course is the study and evaluation of the impacts of information technology (IT) on individuals and society. It explores the advantages and disadvantages of the access and use of digitized information at the local and global level. ITGS provides a framework for the student to make informed judgments and decisions about the use of IT within social contexts.
    Info. Tech. in a Global Society IB SL 2
    Credit Type: SOC
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Department approval
    The IB DP information technology in a global society (ITGS) course is the study and evaluation of the impacts of information technology (IT) on individuals and society. It explores the advantages and disadvantages of the access and use of digitized information at the local and global level. ITGS provides a framework for the student to make informed judgments and decisions about the use of IT within social contexts.
    Info. Tech. in a Global Society IB HL 1
    Credit Type: SOC
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Department approval
    The IB DP information technology in a global society (ITGS) course is the study and evaluation of the impacts of information technology (IT) on individuals and society. It explores the advantages and disadvantages of the access and use of digitized information at the local and global level. ITGS provides a framework for the student to make informed judgments and decisions about the use of IT within social contexts.
    Info. Tech. in a Global Society IB HL 2
    Credit Type: SOC
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Department approval
    The IB DP information technology in a global society (ITGS) course is the study and evaluation of the impacts of information technology (IT) on individuals and society. It explores the advantages and disadvantages of the access and use of digitized information at the local and global level. ITGS provides a framework for the student to make informed judgments and decisions about the use of IT within social contexts.
    Psychology IB SL 2
    Credit Type: SOC
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Department approval
    The IB Diploma Programme standard level psychology course aims to develop an awareness of how research findings can be applied to better understand human behaviour and how ethical practices are upheld in psychological inquiry. Students learn to understand the biological, cognitive and sociocultural influences on human behaviour and explore alternative explanations of behaviour. They also understand and use diverse methods of psychological inquiry.

    Student Resource

    Personal Life Management
    Credit Type: ELEC
    Credit Value: 0.5
    Prerequisite(s): none
    The aim of this course is to enable students to make well-informed, considered decisions and choices in all aspects of their lives and to develop behaviors and attitudes that contribute to the well-being and respect of self and others, now and in the future. This course will help students develop an awareness and understanding of how to better manage their personal well-being and their relationships with others. Students will learn how to set realistic goals, establish priorities, and how to approach decisions regarding future choices.
    Guided Learning
    Credit Type: ELEC
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): none
    The Guided Learning class seeks to help students better understand their individual learning abilities and style. The primary focus is to broaden the students' strengths and use them to minimize what causes them to struggle academically. In class, students set goals based on their specific areas of need, typically in the areas of study skills, time management, test taking, essay planning and writing, written expression, and/or reading comprehension. Students incorporate these learning and study strategies in the context of coursework from their academic classes.

    World Languages

    Introduction to Japanese Culture
    Credit Type: ELE
    Credit Value: 0.5
    Prerequisite(s): none
    This course provides a general introduction to the culture of Japan. Through projects, presentations, field trips and guest speakers, students will gain an understanding of Japanese living and thinking while exploring topics such as sports, education, food, pop culture, holidays, arts and religion. Students will be asked to do short research pieces each week and participate in discussion and other class activities. The course is flexible and can be tailored to suit the interests of the enrolled students.
    French 3
    Credit Type: LAN
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): French 2
    This course is aimed at enhancing all the language skills mainly through the use of the textbook Discovering French Blanc. The focus is set on acquiring a confident command of intermediate language skills in order to sound as close as possible like native speakers of the French language. As often as possible, projects and field trips are also organized throughout the year.
    French 4
    Credit Type: LAN
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): French 3
    Focused on acquiring the skills needed for reading and writing, this course is meant to introduce the standards of assessment for the IB examination in French Language B step by step. Aside from the various reading activities, the students are also introduced to the method for the Individual Oral Presentation. The knowledge of the advanced language skills is enhanced through the use of the textbook Discovering French Rouge. As often as possible, projects and field trips are also organized throughout the year.
    Japanese A Level I 1
    Credit Type: LAN
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): none
    The study of the texts produced in a language is central to an active engagement with language and culture and, by extension, to how we see and understand the world in which we live. Therefore, an objective of this course is to provide students with the linguistic skills necessary to read and understand a wide range of materials covering literature, culture, society and issues pertaining to man and the environment. Assessment will be made through a variety of tasks using specific rubrics.
    Japanese A Level I 2
    Credit Type: LAN
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Japanese A Level I 1
    The study of the texts produced in a language is central to an active engagement with language and culture and, by extension, to how we see and understand the world in which we live. Therefore, an objective of this course is to provide students with the linguistic skills necessary to read and understand a wide range of materials covering literature, culture, society and issues pertaining to man and the environment. Assessment will be made through a variety of tasks using specific rubrics.
    Japanese A Level II 1
    Credit Type: LAN
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Japanese A Level I 2
    The study of the texts produced in a language is central to an active engagement with language and culture and, by extension, to how we see and understand the world in which we live. Therefore, an objective of this course is to provide students with the linguistic skills necessary to read and understand a wide range of materials covering literature, culture, society and issues pertaining to man and the environment. Assessment will be made through a variety of tasks using specific rubrics.
    Japanese A Level II 2
    Credit Type: LAN
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Japanese A Level II 1
    The study of the texts produced in a language is central to an active engagement with language and culture and, by extension, to how we see and understand the world in which we live. Therefore, an objective of this course is to provide students with the linguistic skills necessary to read and understand a wide range of materials covering literature, culture, society and issues pertaining to man and the environment. Assessment will be made through a variety of tasks using specific rubrics.
    Japanese AI Level I
    Credit Type: LAN
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): none
    This course is designed for students with no or little knowledge of the Japanese language. The overall objective of this course is to achieve communicative competence in everyday situations. Students will learn how to express about themselves and their feelings both in oral and writing. Therefore, they need to study Japanese Writing systems (Hiragana, Katakana and Kanji), basic grammatical patterns, and a lot of vocabulary throughout the year.
    Japanese B Level I
    Credit Type: LAN
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Japanese AI Level I or department placement
    This course is designed for students who should already be able to comprehend written and spoken simple Japanese. Students are expected to learn more grammar patterns (e.g. conjugate verbs ) to make long and complex sentences and use them in reading, writing, speaking and listening. Students also need to perform what they have achieved in class in various ways, such as giving presentation, role-plays and writing short essays. About 160 Kanji will be covered in this course.
    Japanese B Level II
    Credit Type: LAN
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Japanese B Level I or department placement
    This course is a continuation of Japanese B Level? and emphasizes grammatical structure and vocabulary. Students will strengthen their oral, reading and writing language skills through giving a presentation, acting out role-plays and writing short essays using complex sentence structures. About 300 Kanji will be covered in this course.
    Japanese B Level III
    Credit Type: LAN
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Japanese B Level II or department placement
    This course is designed for students who should already be able to comprehend basic written and spoken Japanese. Students are expected to speak and write Japanese within the context of more complex sentence structures. Students are expected to deepen their reading, writing, and understanding of Japanese society, culture and language. Students also need to perform what they have achieved in class in various ways.
    Japanese B Level IV
    Credit Type: LAN
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Japanese B Level III or department placement
    This course is designed for students who should already be able to comprehend basic written and spoken Japanese. Students are expected to speak and write Japanese within the context of more complex sentence structures. Students are expected to deepen their reading, writing, and understanding of Japanese society, culture and language. Students also need to perform what they have achieved in class in various ways.
    French B IB HL 1
    Credit Type: LAN
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): French 4
    This course follows French 4 and aims at preparing the students for French as Language B of the IB diploma. The course is developed through the Junior and Senior years. At this stage, the students have a command of French language sufficient enough to allow them to delve into authentic material and use skills to understand it. Emphasis is put on consistently using and reinforcing all of the language skills through various media in accordance with the standards defined by the IBO. These skills are polished all the while enhancing awareness of the cultural specificities of the francophone world through three main themes: Social Relations, World themes, Communication and media.
    French B IB HL 2
    Credit Type: LAN
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): French 4
    This course follows French 4 and aims at preparing the students for French as Language B of the IB diploma. The course is developed through the Junior and Senior years. At this stage, the students have a command of French language sufficient enough to allow them to delve into authentic material and use skills to understand it. Emphasis is put on consistently using and reinforcing all of the language skills through various media in accordance with the standards defined by the IBO. These skills are polished all the while enhancing awareness of the cultural specificities of the francophone world through three main themes: Social Relations, World themes, Communication and media.
    French B IB SL 1
    Credit Type: LAN
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): French 4
    This course follows French 4 and aims at preparing the students for French as Language B of the IB diploma. The course is developed through the Junior and Senior years. At this stage, the students have a command of French language sufficient enough to allow them to delve into authentic material and use skills to understand it. Emphasis is put on consistently using and reinforcing all of the language skills through various media in accordance with the standards defined by the IBO. These skills are polished all the while enhancing awareness of the cultural specificities of the francophone world through three main themes: Social Relations, World themes, Communication and media.
    French B IB SL 2
    Credit Type: LAN
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): French 4
    This course follows French 4 and aims at preparing the students for French as Language B of the IB diploma. The course is developed through the Junior and Senior years. At this stage, the students have a command of French language sufficient enough to allow them to delve into authentic material and use skills to understand it. Emphasis is put on consistently using and reinforcing all of the language skills through various media in accordance with the standards defined by the IBO. These skills are polished all the while enhancing awareness of the cultural specificities of the francophone world through three main themes: Social Relations, World themes, Communication and media.
    Japanese A IB SL 1
    Credit Type: LAN
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Japanese A Level I/II 2 and Department approval
    Language A: Language and Literature is a course focusing on developing an understanding of the constructed nature of meanings generated by language. Two parts of the course relate to the study of language and two to the study of literature. This course is designed for students with a very high level of proficiency in the target language. The Language A courses (SL and HL) focus on refining students' language skills through analysis of literary texts and articles related to cultural topics. Students will learn to recognize and analyze aspects of style and register and to incorporate these aspects in their own writing. The students will need to use the target language accurately and show a high level of proficiency.
    Japanese A IB SL 2
    Credit Type: LAN
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Japanese A Level I/II 2 and Department approval
    Language A: Language and Literature is a course focusing on developing an understanding of the constructed nature of meanings generated by language. Two parts of the course relate to the study of language and two to the study of literature. This course is designed for students with a very high level of proficiency in the target language. The Language A courses (SL and HL) focus on refining students' language skills through analysis of literary texts and articles related to cultural topics. Students will learn to recognize and analyze aspects of style and register and to incorporate these aspects in their own writing. The students will need to use the target language accurately and show a high level of proficiency.
    Japanese A IB HL 1
    Credit Type: LAN
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Japanese A Level I/II 2 and Department approval
    Language A: Language and Literature is a course focusing on developing an understanding of the constructed nature of meanings generated by language. Two parts of the course relate to the study of language and two to the study of literature. This course is designed for students with a very high level of proficiency in the target language. The Language A courses (SL and HL) focus on refining students' language skills through analysis of literary texts and articles related to cultural topics. Students will learn to recognize and analyze aspects of style and register and to incorporate these aspects in their own writing. The students will need to use the target language accurately and show a high level of proficiency.
    Japanese A IB HL 2
    Credit Type: LAN
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Japanese A Level I/II 2 and Department approval
    Language A: Language and Literature is a course focusing on developing an understanding of the constructed nature of meanings generated by language. Two parts of the course relate to the study of language and two to the study of literature. This course is designed for students with a very high level of proficiency in the target language. The Language A courses (SL and HL) focus on refining students' language skills through analysis of literary texts and articles related to cultural topics. Students will learn to recognize and analyze aspects of style and register and to incorporate these aspects in their own writing. The students will need to use the target language accurately and show a high level of proficiency.
    Japanese B IB SL 1
    Credit Type: LAN
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Japanese B Level III/IV and Department approval
    The main focus on this course is on development of language skills necessary to meet the demands of daily social contact. 600 kanji will be studied for 2 years and students will write composition by using them. In addition, the course aims to develop the students' intercultural understanding. Therefore, HL level students are required to read two works of literature originally written in Japanese and articles about global issues and current issues in Japan.
    Japanese B IB SL 2
    Credit Type: LAN
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Japanese B Level III/IV and Department approval
    The main focus on this course is on development of language skills necessary to meet the demands of daily social contact. 600 kanji will be studied for 2 years and students will write composition by using them. In addition, the course aims to develop the students' intercultural understanding. Therefore, HL level students are required to read two works of literature originally written in Japanese and articles about global issues and current issues in Japan.
    Japanese B IB HL 1
    Credit Type: LAN
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Japanese B Level III/IV and Department approval
    The main focus on this course is on development of language skills necessary to meet the demands of daily social contact. 600 kanji will be studied for 2 years and students will write composition by using them. In addition, the course aims to develop the students' intercultural understanding. Therefore, HL level students are required to read two works of literature originally written in Japanese and articles about global issues and current issues in Japan.
    Japanese IB Ab Initio 1
    Credit Type: LAN
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Department approval
    Ab Initio Japanese is for beginning Japanese speakers. Students are required to develop their reading and writing skills by reading basic topics. Students are also required to improve their speaking skills via presentations based on the externally set IB topics.
    Japanese B IB HL 2
    Credit Type: LAN
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Japanese B Level III/IV and Department approval
    The main focus on this course is on development of language skills necessary to meet the demands of daily social contact. 600 kanji will be studied for 2 years and students will write composition by using them. In addition, the course aims to develop the students' intercultural understanding. Therefore, HL level students are required to read two works of literature originally written in Japanese and articles about global issues and current issues in Japan.
    Japanese IB Ab Initio 2
    Credit Type: LAN
    Credit Value: 1
    Prerequisite(s): Department approval
    Ab Initio Japanese is for beginning Japanese speakers. Students are required to develop their reading and writing skills by reading basic topics. Students are also required to improve their speaking skills via presentations based on the externally set IB topics.
    Introduction to Japanese Culture
    Credit Type: ELEC
    Credit Value: 0.5
    Prerequisite(s): none
    This course provides a general introduction to the culture of Japan. Through projects, presentations, field trips and guest speakers, students will gain an understanding of Japanese living and thinking while exploring topics such as sports, education, food, pop culture, holidays, arts and religion. Students will be asked to do short research pieces each week and participate in discussion and other class activities. The course is flexible and can be tailored to suit the interests of the enrolled students.

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